Samsung Galaxy S 2 Unboxing | Pocketnow

hey guys it's Brandon minimun from pocketnow.com 2010 was the year of the Samsung Galaxy S we found it on every major carrier it was a hot device had great battery life great performance really thin form factors and in 2011 samsung is back with their new flagship the galaxy s2 this phone ups the ante in every respect it's faster it's thinner it has a bigger screen and in this video we're going to unbox the galaxy s2 let's get to it ok so here we go so a lot of improvements to talk about between the galaxy s and the galaxy s2 we've got the new Exynos processor I'm not sure if I'm saying that right the 1.2 gigahertz dual-core Samsung proprietary process that goes right up against the snapdragon 1.2 gigahertz processor coming out on the HTC Sensation I've got some extra packaging here and thanks to our friends at clove Co UK for sending us the unit 2 review right now this phone is 440 British pounds which is about seven hundred and twenty-two dollars yes it's very expensive but hey it'll actually work on the on us ATT frequencies so that's an added little bonus there and plus this is a device that just came out so you got to expect the press to be very high very likely that this phone will see release on all major US and international carriers so you can keep an eye out for lower subsidized prices so here it is small little box galaxy s2 1.2 gigahertz this is incredible the previous Galaxy S had a single core 1 gigahertz processor and now we're going to 1.2 gigahertz and having two cores this is going to be awesome let's take a look what we have on the back here dual core 8 megapixel camera this shoots 1080p video and it can also play it back in 1080p if you connect it to a television we've got DLNA support a huge 1650 milliamp hour battery and the interesting thing about that is that this device is the thinnest smartphone you can buy right now it's a little bit over 8 millimeters thick it's got the Super AMOLED plus screen you can tell the time excited about this Samsung had the super-mo LED debut in the galaxy s devices now they're going with the plus they also made the screen bigger this screen is going to be all inspiring we're thinking the only problem with it is that the screen is WVGA resolution it's not qHD like all the higher-end devices are coming with but maybe the the Super AMOLED plus will be so nice that we won't even care comes with 16 gigs of internal memory we've got Wi-Fi a B G and n Android 2.3 you get the point let's let's break the seal here there's no turning back now and open up this little tiny box Wow social hub premium GPS ok let's just see what comes in the box this thing is remarkably thin and I wish you can actually be here holding it I just have to stop and just comment on this I cannot believe how thin this phone is it's so powerful it's got such a big screen and yet it is thinner than any phone I've ever held Wow this is unbelievable it's pencil thin ok let's see what else is in the box before you know going crazy about the thickness of the phone we've got headphones which is nice kind of nice looking headphones with little chrome pieces there let's see we've got a micro USB charger which is nice of course the European plug but your standard plugs will work with that if you plan to use this in the US extra earbuds and here's the quite large sixteen hundred and fifty million power battery this function a pretty impressive battery life and what we're going to do is put the battery in I'm going to get an AT&T SIM card and plug it in immediately so we can do the first time boot up on the beautifully thin Samsung Galaxy S 2 and let's just take a look at the front we're getting a lot of reflection from here so off tak turn off some of the lights but what's interesting is that you can't see any buttons when the phone's off kind of like the Nexus S we've got the back button here we've got the home button without a home logo on it so kind of a very sleek looking design oh it looks too much like an iPhone Apple might get mad by that but maybe not and we've got the menu button here on the left front-facing camera let's get a SIM card in here let's get the battery in we'll be right back all right SIM cards in battery is in this thing is very very light even with the SIM card and usually the problem with light is it feels cheap this phone does not feel cheap okay so let's try to pop on the back battery cover by the way back here we've got this really interesting textured plastic maybe you can see it in the light it's got these raised little bumps that give it a good in hand feel we've got sort of a reverse chin here usually the chin occurs on the front speaker here doesn't look like it as dual speakers we've got a you know something to connect a lanyard loop to we've got a 3.5 millimeter headphone jack secondary mic for noise cancellation it is just amazing how thin this thing is power standby button on the left that's a little bit different than Samsung had been doing usually they put the button on the top so let's press and hold that and while that's booting up let's compare that to some other devices so here we've got the htc inspire 4G and it's got a little bit of fingerprints on here but it did in a second ago kind of weird so the inspire 4G was one of the thinnest phones to come out it's basically the Desire HD which was HTC's flagship of last year and let's see how they compare in terms of thickness there's no contest here the Desire HD is about 12 millimeters thick which is quite thin but again we're going at under 9 millimeters on the galaxy s 2 so it's just it's amazing how much thinner it is so here we have a network does it provide dayton time ok great it's kind of up there we go just turn to 3g so we're getting 3g network connectivity here on AT&T we'll zoom in a little bit a lot of options here automatic will go through this later there seems to be no confirm button so if I hit the back button and I'll do change language the United States it's really cool to see the Super AMOLED plus screen on such a large display all of the Galaxy S phones came with a 4-inch display so it's very interesting to see such incredible contrast over a large display let's see if we can kind of get out here guess we're gonna have to go through this okay we'll do all of this in a little bit and we'll show you what it's like again let's let's bring out some other devices to compare with before we actually do that turn that off over here is the iPhone 4 which is starting to look kind of small in comparison to these devices that have these big bright 4.3 inch displays so we've got the front facing camera al that looks a lot bigger here on the galaxy s 2 in terms of thickness the galaxy s 2 is thinner than the iPhone 4 which is a tremendous feat considering the iPhone 4 like the Desire HD is one of the thinnest devices out there also next to another device that has a 4.3 inch screen the Big Daddy the HTC Thunderbolt of course the galaxy s2 does not have 4G although it's very likely in 2011 and 2012 we're going to see versions of the galaxy s2 come out with LTE and HSPA+ and WiMAX and all of those good radio technologies all right so I put in the Google account information and what we have here is the new version of TouchWiz TouchWiz 4 which is Samsung's proprietary interface now a lot of people after they got the galaxy s devices put on a third-party launcher like launcher pro or ADW launcher because the galaxy s devices had this weird TouchWiz interface it wasn't that fast it wasn't that usable but it looks like Samsung has really gone above and beyond with their new interface the program tray looks about the same but they've got these new widgets that kind of stick together we're obviously gonna have to spend some time with this and we're gonna have a full video that talks all about what it's like to use TouchWiz 4 and here's something cool move device left or right while holding a selected icon to reposition to another page that is pretty cool so if we tap and hold and we tilt apparently if there's a feature that makes it a lot easier well that looks awesome there's a feature that makes it a lot easier to move widgets from homescreen to homescreen right now we're getting HSDPA on AT&T we should be getting faster data speeds than you can get onto the Atrix 4G and the inspire 4G because those devices don't seem to even advantage of HSDPA speeds so this might be a killer device to get on AT&T if you don't want to wait it will work on t-mobile but you won't get the 3G connectivity we've got a ton more coming up on the Samsung Galaxy S 2 it's really exciting for us to test one of the flagship devices of 2011 HTC's coming out of the gate with a sensation in the near future and Samsung is coming out of the gate with the Galle galaxy s 2 Super AMOLED plus screen 1.2 gigahertz dual-core processor it's pretty awesome if you liked this video please give us a thumbs up and if you think I was too enthusiastic about this phone please give us a thumbs up and thanks for watching we'll be back soon with more that's it for now

As found on YouTube

Sony Xperia 1 review: a tall order

The thing that I like about Android is there can be so many
different kinds of phones, just a lot of weird choices. But lately, it seems like
there are really only two choices, at least in terms of screen size. There's regular and there's extra large, which is why I was so excited
to try this phone right here, the Sony Xperia 1. I mean, just look at this good tall boy. It's got a 21:9 aspect ratio, which makes it relatively
narrow and super, well, tall. I think it's a fascinating phone, and it's way nicer than
I expected it to be. But I don't think it can
really justify its $950 price. Let me tell you why. Now, a lot of people would
like to have a big-screened phone, but they're put off by
how big these phones feel.

And that's the reason I like the Xperia 1. It has a big screen, there
is no doubt about it. It's 6.5 inches. But it's quite a bit narrower
than this OnePlus 7 Pro here. So you get the benefits of
seeing more stuff on your screen, like on the web or on Twitter, without the drawback of
feeling like you have a big honking glass slab you can barely wrap your fingers around. This phone is also really good if you like to do split-screen apps, which… I don’t know, I guess
people still do that. I never do. Anyway, it's nicer to hold, but that doesn't make
it a one-handed phone by any stretch of the imagination.

You're still going to need
to use your second hand to reach the top of the screen. Sony has a couple of
software tricks that help with how tall this phone is, but neither of them are great. You can double tap the home button to make a smaller version of the screen. Or there's this other thing with… Er, wow. What are you
doing there, Chuckles? Huh. Sorry, let's back up. Or you're supposed to be able to tap either side of the screen or swipe on it to do other stuff. It's called Side Sense,
and it kind of sucks. I can never get it to
work when I want it to, and it pops up all of the time when I don't want it to.

Now the reason that Sony
says it made this phone at this weird, tall aspect ratio is for watching movies, and Sony says that it
has a 4K HDR OLED screen. It also has, quote, “professional
level color reproduction.” So it can be in the DCI-P3 color gamut. It can also be in the BT.2020 color space if you care about that. And it has the D65 white point. There's this whole “Creator Mode” thing. Basically, Sony is
trying to make this phone appeal to people who really
care about video quality, both watching it and recording it. But Sony, the thing is, if you're going to do that, this screen should get way brighter. It is way more dim compared
to other OLED screens. Anyway, yeah, I will say
watching a 21:9 movie on this phone with its Dolby
stuff, without letterboxing or weird camera cutouts, is great. But the truth is that most
of the video that I watch is not 21:9.

It’s stuff on YouTube, and so I still end up
having big black bars on the left or the right. Or, if I expand it full screen, I end up cutting off people's heads. Now, I do think this phone is pretty good from a build quality perspective. It's got Gorilla Glass and IP68. It's got some bezels,
but they're not too big, and it's just nice to hold. But, you know, of course
there's no headphone jack. But there's no getting around how it being this tall
makes it really awkward. It's so tall, it couldn't
fit in my pocket. I was sitting down, and it just slid right out of my pocket and clattered on the concrete, which is why there are dings on the edges of the
phone on our review unit, which is sad. The buttons are also awkward.

They're all on the right side of the phone and, I don’t know, the fingerprint sensor is separate from the power
button for some reason. And sometimes it gets a little dirty and you have to wipe it off
before it will actually work. I do like that there is
a dedicated camera button. But overall, when I'm
trying to use this phone, I just end up hitting the wrong button, like, all of the time.

On the back, there are
three 12-megapixel cameras. There's a regular, a 2X
telephoto, and a wide. Sony put some nice optical
image stabilization on the main lens, and you know what? Finally, Sony has made
a phone with a camera that's pretty good. It's not quite as good as a Pixel 3 or a OnePlus 7 Pro to my eyes, but it's finally respectable.

I do wish that the
telephoto was more than 2X, but the wide angle one, it's really fun. I kind of love it. But I don't love Sony's camera software. The wide angle thing makes you pick between prioritizing image
quality or distortion. The auto made doesn't do HDR by default, and there's just a bunch of other settings that just really look
and feel kind of silly. Anyway, let's get into the results of what I actually get
out of these lenses. I think that Sony
prefers leaving detail in, even though that also
leaves in a bunch of noise. It also doesn't do as
aggressive HDR as I would like unless you have to, you
know, manually turn it on.

But the thing that did surprise me is that even though there's
no dedicated night mode, sometimes it actually
really nails it anyway, even if it's incredibly dark. Now, you can shoot 4K, and
that's one of the reasons this phone exists. And so Sony also
included a Cinema Pro app that lets you really dial
in all these manual settings for shooting 4K video. Unfortunately, the 8-megapixel camera on the front is junk.

It's really not good. I don't know, man. If this phone didn't cost $950, I'd probably be a little
bit less nit-picky, but you know what? It does. So I am. In terms of software and performance, I actually don't have a ton of complaints. It's a fairly clean version of Android 9 with just a few bells and whistles. It has a Snapdragon 855 processor so it's fast, and there's 6GB of RAM, which is decent, but not stellar. I am a little bit grumpy that there's only one storage option:
128GB of storage. If you're going to want more, and especially if you're
going to want to shoot 4K, you're going to need to expand it. And you can because there's
a microSD card slot. Battery life is
average-ish for big phones. I'm getting over four hours of screen time, and it's lasting through a day, but there's only a 3,300mAh battery in here, and I kind of feel like that's not enough.

I would be happier with that if there was wireless
charging on this phone. But no, there's not. It does do fast charging, but one neat thing Sony does is it won't fast-charge when it knows that you’re charging overnight, which helps with the overall
life span of the battery, which means it should last longer, a year or two for now — at least in theory. Now, after all that, if you're still interested in this phone, you should also know
that Sony as a company has kind of been deemphasizing phones since it hasn't been
really successful with them in the past few years.

And that kind of makes sense, and I also think it makes sense for Sony to try something new and move into this niche
of making tall boys, like this guy right here. Now, of course, you can spend less money and get a better phone
like the OnePlus 7 Pro, but what you can't get is any other phone in this tall aspect ratio, so I like the idea of this form factor. I think that it should exist in
the world of Android phones. So I'm glad that Sony's
trying to make 21:9 happen. But I don't know that I'd
recommend this particular phone to anybody. If you really, really,
really love the tall screen or you really love what
Sony does with video, then maybe.

But there's no getting around the fact that this is an expensive phone. For $950, I expect more,
and you should, too. Hey, thank you for watching. Do you want a tall phone? Let me know in the comments below. Also, if you're wondering if
there are other tall phones, we did review the Xperia 10 last month. It's kind of the same idea but cheaper and also, it's really bad for a whole other set of reasons.

But if you want to see a
review of a good big phone, click here..

As found on YouTube

SAMSUNG’S FIRST TRANSPARENT PHONE | TRANSPARENT MOBILE PHONE

once in a while you hear about transparent smartphones although various smartphone manufacturers have been developing this advanced technology for decades there are as yet no devices available that are fully transparent samsung looks busy with the development of a transparent display device which i will tell you in detail but if you are new here and want to stay up to date about the latest tech reviews and news please hit the subscribe followed by the bell in january 2020 samsung electronics filed a utility patent with the united states patent and trademark office the patent was published on august 27 2020 and describes the technology needed to create a transparent smartphone alternatively the technology could also be applicable to other consumer electronics products such as a tv monitor laptop and game console as a basis an oled display is used which is characterized by low power consumption high brightness and a faster response time than conventional lcd displays the oled screen is equipped with a transparent luminous display panel through which light can shine thus content can be displayed on the transparent screen while users can simultaneously see through the phone it can be a flat display but also a flexible screen that can bend fold and a roll according to the patent description it is a technically defined patent that goes into great detail about the different layers and components required to achieve transparency the patent images show a modern smartphone with narrow bezels and the large transparent screen each pixel on the phone's display would allow light to pass through it effectively rendering the screen transparent in samsung's patent drawings that transparent screen resembles a window through which the holder's hand can be seen only the bezels seem to be opaque dreams of transparent phones aren't new lg had a crack in 2009 with the gd 900 but it only featured a transparent keypad sony ericsson followed up with the xperia pureness which to its credit did feature a transparent display it wasn't very good though the company would need to find a way of housing the battery and other components so as to not interfere with the transparent display or somehow make those elements transparent too it's a problem that was demonstrated by taiwanese firm polytron technologies transparent phone in 2013.

the sd card and ribbon cables were still visible despite the phone's largely transparent body these patents rarely develop into mainstream devices so don't expect samsung to launch a transparent galaxy s or note series shortly but the search for the next big smartphone innovation is taking companies to extreme if not impractical lengths that's the end of this video let us know your thoughts in the comment section below i will see you in my next video you.

As found on YouTube

Surface Duo first look: Microsoft’s foldable Android phone

– Remember Windows Phone
from way back when? Well Microsoft is kind
of getting back into making smartphones. This is Surface Duo, and it runs Android. Not Windows or Windows Phone. That's right. Microsoft is making a
Surface phone with Android. If that sounds surprising, it's because it really is. But we'll get back into the Android side in a minute. Duo is part of two new futuristic dual-screen devices that
Microsoft announced today. And they're coming in Holiday 2020. Surface Duo has two 5.6 inch displays that fold out into an
8.3 inch device overall. And it's just 4.8 millimeters thin. It folds like many two-in-one laptops thanks to a 360 degrees hinge. And it's designed to
get more done on the go. It looks tiny for this type of device, and it felt kind of like a Galaxy Note in my pocket. Now, I wasn't allowed to play around with the software on this device, but it looks and feels
like a tiny pocket tablet that's also a phone. The difference between this and any other Android phone, except maybe the Galaxy Fold, is visually obvious.

But Microsoft thinks this is part of a new category of devices that allow people to do a lot more with tablets and phones
than they do today. As part of this idea, Microsoft also announced a
Surface Neo device today. Which has two larger 9 inch displays. The Duo and the Neo share a very similar design, but they don't share a
common operating system. Neo, the larger dual-screen device, runs Windows 10 X, and has all your familiar
desktop and tablet apps. The reason this isn't
running Windows Phone is because Microsoft gave up on that operating system years ago, when it couldn't convince developers to create apps for it's devices. Now we sat down with Microsoft's Chief Product Officer, Panos Panay, on the Vergecast this week, to talk about why Microsoft
chose Android this time for the Surface Duo.

– [Panay] Well because, those are the apps you want. I don't know how to answer it differently for you. Because there's hundreds
of thousands of apps and you want them. Asati and I talked about it, it's about meeting our
customers where they are. And I don't think the, you know, the mobile application platform's going anywhere any time soon, you need the apps. – So you'll get the apps you'd expect from a phone inside
the dual-screen device, but how is this different from any other smartphone? I mean it obviously looks different. And the main idea is making use of these two displays in ways we're only starting to see other Android phone makers explore. You could run a game on one side, and a game pad on the other, or multi-task by dragging
and dropping content between apps. Microsoft hasn't thought
of everything you'd do with the Surface Duo just yet, but that's why it's announcing it now so developers can fill in the gaps.

They're really aiming to introduce a new form factor here, and a way for a device to
adjust itself on the go, no matter the task. We've seen foldable devices from Huawei and Samsung, but the Duo has two separate displays that are made of glass, rather than foldable plastic. Which given the issues
with Samsung's Galaxy Fold, that might be a good choice right now. Microsoft has been
working on this hardware for three years, and Panos Panay tells us that this device won't change much by the time it debuts late next year.

The real key question will be whether Android app developers create the apps and
experiences that really take advantage of this dual-screen device. And whether consumers
want this type of hardware in a phone form factor in the first place. That's why Microsoft also has its largest Surface Neo device running Windows. And it really feels like the company wants to offer a Surface at every shape and size. Microsoft also seems to be implying that the operating system really doesn't matter for
Surface devices anymore.

And it's willing to partner
with Google and others to offer what makes sense. So does that means that
Android is the future for Microsoft? – [Panay] (clears throat)
No no no no no no. You want to give customers what they want in the form factor that they're using. We've learned this, you know, the right operating system
on the wrong product or the other way around, pick your words, but what's the right operating system for the form factor? And in this case, in mobile devices, Android's
the obvious choice. But anything above that, Windows is everything.

Superior for me. – So, will the Surface
Duo and the Surface Neo combine in the future? Will there be a smartphone
that turns into a tablet, that then turns into a laptop, then you dock and turns into a real PC? We're years away from anything even getting close to that. But it opens up the questions about where this dual-screen and foldable hardware is going exactly. And they're really hard
questions to answer right now. Microsoft will now need to convince app developers and consumers that these dual-screen devices are truly the new device category that we've
all been waiting for.

Wherever things end up, it looks like Microsoft want to be ready at every point with Surface. You want a phone that's a little bit more than a phone that
has an extra display? Surface Duo. You want a tablet that
transforms into a laptop? Surface Neo or Surface Pro. Microsoft is covering
every hardware base here, and it's leaving it up to you to decide what device you actually need.

– [Panay] You know, I think like anything, look at the product you think is most interesting to you and where you think you can be more creative, that's what I would push. And I think this products gonna be there next year. Not in a hurry, you know, hang out. Take photos or do whatever it is you do on your phone today
for a little bit longer and then, see if we can convince you that you can be more
creative on this product. – It's been a crazy day of Surface devices and there's a bunch of hands-on videos you should check out
on our YouTube channel.

Be sure to also definitely
check out the Vergecast, 'cause it has the full
interview with Panos Panay, and you don't wanna miss it..

As found on YouTube