Top 5 BEST Smartphones of 2021…. So Far

– What's up, guys? SuperSaf here, and believe it or not we're almost halfway through 2021 already. Time really does fly. And, so far this year we've had some amazing
smartphones already. Now, like I've been doing
for the past few years, halfway through the year I do give you my top five
personal picks of the year so far. Now, before we get into the
list, a few disclaimers. I've tested a lot of smartphones
this year, but obviously I've not tested every single one. So there may be a
smartphone that you think should have been featured,
which hasn't been. That's absolutely fine. Please drop that in the comments below and I'll try to test it out and include it in the final end of year list. Second disclaimer, this is
my personal top five list.

It might be different to your list. That's absolutely fine guys. We can still be friends.
There's no need to fight. Please drop your top picks
down in the comments below. This list is in no particular order. I'm just giving you my top five. And because this list is of devices released in 2021, there are no iPhones in this top five list. Yes, we did have the purple iPhone 12, but that's just a different color. It doesn't really count
as a different smartphone. If you must know, the
iPhone that I use most is the iPhone 12 Pro Max. I've had it since the day it was released. I really like the cameras,
they're very consistent. It's got some of the best video on any smartphone right now and it's got excellent battery life.

Now there's definitely
room for improvement. We don't have the best
display on the iPhone. There's lots of other
smartphones, this year especially, that do overtake the iPhone in terms of display with high refresh rates. And the iPhone that I think
most people will opt for is the iPhone 12. I've covered both the iPhone 12 Pro Max as well as the iPhone
12 in separate reviews. I'll link those in the
comments and the description. And if you are thinking about buying an iPhone,
personally speaking, I would recommend you wait a few months.

September is likely when
we're going to be hearing about the next new
iPhones, the iPhone 13s. So it might be worth just
waiting a little bit longer unless you get a great deal. Now, with all of that out of the way, let's go ahead and get to
the 2021 top five list. So, the first smartphone on my list in no particular order, is
the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra. Now the S21 Ultra came
out very early this year and it has been the Android
smartphone that's been in my pocket for the
longest period of time.

And that's because Samsung
really did take a lot of feedback from users on the S20
Ultra and pretty much improved everything that we had asked for. So we've got an excellent
display with 120 hertz. We've got a very unique design,
which we don't really see on any other smartphone,
with a camera module really blending into the sides. And I'm a little bit biased but the matte black version
looks absolutely stunning.

We've got excellent overall
cameras with, in my opinion the best zoom on any smartphone right now. 10x obstacle zoom, which
can be extended quite a bit. Now, we no longer get a
charger included out of the box which isn't great for a
smartphone of this price. And the charging is also
not the fastest out there. It's only 25 watts wired charging. And this year we no longer
have a MicroSD card slot. Something that a lot of people are used to on Samsung Galaxy devices. But, regardless, it's
an excellent smartphone and I can easily recommend it. Right, moving on. The next smartphone on my list was also a smartphone
that came up pretty early but has kind of got forgotten a little bit and that is the Oppo Find X3 Pro. Now Oppo really did try to tick all of the boxes with this device.

We've got an excellent display. We've got some great overall cameras and what's quite unique is that we have the same sensor for the primary as well as the ultra wide camera, which you don't really see
on many of the devices. And we also have the world's first microscope camera on a smartphone. Now this is something
that I initially thought was a bit of a gimmick, but after using it, I
actually found I was using it more than the telephoto camera. Just kind of getting my
camera close up to things and really being able to see the details is just so, so much fun. There's also 65 watt charging included out of the box with 35
watt wireless charging. And it's also quite compact
for a full size flagship. It's only around 8.26 millimeters thin, which makes it a lot lighter
and a lot easier to use compared to some of the
other flagships out there. Now, of course it's not perfect. There's definitely room for improvement.

I think the selfie camera could
be improved, it's only 1080p and with the design, although
the way the camera module rises up is quite unique,
the overall design does look very similar to
the iPhone 12 Pro Max. I also think the device
is priced slightly high, especially if we compare it to the next smartphone on this list and that is the OnePlus 9 Pro. Now OnePlus and Oppo are partner companies so we do see a lot of similarities, especially from the front. The displays look almost identical. This is not a bad thing. We do have 120 hertz on both displays and they're very good. The OnePlus 9 Pro, however does come in quite a bit cheaper compared to the Oppo Find X3 Pro. And for that, you're not
really missing out on too much. You do get a premium built design Warp Charge 65T included
out of the box with support for wireless charge 50T,
which is very, very fast.

And although the
internals are very similar to other flagships out there, what you find with the OnePlus 9 Pro is that, thanks to OxygenOS, it is very, very fast and smooth. We also have some big improvements for the cameras this
year on the OnePlus 9 Pro with the ability to record
8K from both the primary as well as the ultra wide camera. And we have this massive
Hassleblad partnership which in my opinion, didn't
fully live up to the hype and although the cameras
have improved with time with software updates, I still
think that the Hassleblad partnership fruits will be
seen a few years down the line.

Now the front facing
camera is still not good as with the Find X3 Pro, it's just 1080p but overall, the one plus
nine pro is a great package. Now, before we move on, if you're enjoying this video so far, please do consider
subscribing to the channel. Around 60% of you watching
are not subscribed. What's that all about? Do subscribe, hit that bell icon, so you don't miss future
coverage like this. Right, now the next smartphone on my list I mean, it's complete overkill, it ticks pretty much all of the boxes and that is the Xiaomi Mi 11 Ultra. Now this device arguably
has one of the best displays on the market right now. Definitely one of the brightest displays out there with 1700 nits. You've got 120 hertz refresh rate with 480 hertz touch sampling. It's got a very premium ceramic build. You've got 67 watts
wired charging included but you've also got support
for 67 watt wireless charging, some of the fastest wireless charging you're going to find out there.

You also get a secondary
display on the back which can be used as a viewfinder for the rear facing cameras, which means you can get some
very high quality selfies. Now, the cameras overall, in my experience did not live up to the hype. Yes, they have been improved over time, but things like the 120X at
the back on a zoom camera that only has five times
optical zoom capability in my opinion, was just bad at marketing. I mean, sure, the Zoom's good, but it doesn't not compare to the zoom on something like the S21 Ultra. Now moving on, the final
smartphone on my list. This was definitely very
difficult to choose, but I think it's going to have to be the best compact Android
smartphone out there, in my opinion and that is the ASus Zenfone 8. Now this was a bit of
a surprise from ASus. Traditionally we've had the
flip, which we still have but the Zenfone 8, for me,
was a device that comes in at a very competitive price point with pretty much all of the internals that you have on any other flagship.

There's really not many compromises made. You've got 120 hertz display. You do have a respectable
4,000 milliampere battery with 30 watt charging
included out of the box and a 3.5 millimeter headphone jack which you're not going to find on any other smartphone on this list. So, very impressive there. Now, you don't get
wireless charging included and it can seem like a pretty basic phone. It's not got any bells and whistles but if you are after a
compact flagship smartphone, then the Asus Zenfone 8
is an easy recommendation. Now, I do have lots of honorable mentions because there's so many great
smartphones that I have used. We do have the gaming smartphone, such as the ROG Phone 5, the pro the one that I liked best,
which was the ultimate edition 144 hertz display, 6,000
milliampere battery with lots of triggers for gaming. And then we also had
the Legion Phone Duel 2, which, in my opinion, is more of a gaming
device than a smartphone.

And that's because it's really been built for gaming completely in landscape, including the pop-up selfie camera, 144 hertz display, a built-in fan to keep your device cool
after long gaming periods, as well as two USB ports, which you can use simultaneously
for dual turbo charging. This just absolutely blew my mind. The ability to plug in two USB-C cables to up to a 90 watt charger which give you some
very, very fast charging. We also had the ASus Zenfone Flip, which allows you to use
the rear facing cameras as front facing cameras
with 8K video recording. Overall, a great smartphone.

The S21 as well as the 21 Plus, which offer a lot of features
that the S 21 ultra offers, but at a lower price, even
compared to last year. We've also had the Vivo X60 Pro as well as the X60 Pro Plus. Very promising devices, which unfortunately, I have not had a massive amount of time to play with. And let's not forget some
of the budget options that we've had this year,
such as the Realme 8 Pro which I was very impressed with. 108 megapixel camera, 50
watt dock charging included out of the box, all for under 300 pounds. We also had the Poco F3 with the Qualcomm
Snapdragon 870 processor, 120 hertz refresh rate, again coming in at around 300 pounds, which is absolutely insane.

And then I also got to test
out the Infinix Note 10 Pro which is a device that retails
for around 259 dollars, has a 90 hertz display,
256 gigabytes of storage with 8 gigabytes of RAM at that very competitive price. I mean, I could potentially
do a separate video altogether for the top five budget smartphones. Definitely let me know
in the comments below if you'd like me to do that. And that is my top five list
with the honorable mentions. What are your favorite
smartphones of the year so far? Do drop those in the comments below. I hope you enjoyed this
video and found it useful. If you did, then do smash
that like that for me. And if you haven't already,
then be sure to subscribe and hit that bell icon. We are going to be having
the end year full roundup as well as the SuperSaf
Style collaboration with all my friends, which you definitely don't want to miss. Thanks for watching. This is Saf on SuperSaf TV. I'll see you next time..

As found on YouTube

RETRO TECH: DYNATAC

Marques: Before cell phones,
it was a very different world.
Couldn't really walk around.
You were kinda stuck
to wherever the phone was. Absolutely no privacy,
and anyone could pick up
the phone and listen
to your conversation.
Woman:
Growing up, I always really
wanted a cell phone,
but my parents wouldn't
let me have one. Getting my first cell phone
was freaking mind-blowing. One of my earlier cell phones
was, like, a flip phone. There is something
really satisfying
about cracking it open. – ( snapping )
– The cell phone gives you
this sense of independence. I thought I was the coolest. I thought I was
a super tech girl. Oh, my God. My first cell phone
was the ultimate freedom. Marques:
I'm Marques Brownlee,
and I review dope new tech.
But on this show,
I'm rewinding the clock
to discover the tech
of the past
that changed
our lives forever.
This is
"Retro Tech: DynaTAC."
Hey, what's up, guys?
MKBHD here.

As you already know,
I'm pretty into tech, and specifically
a lot of smartphones. My first ever cell phone was this little blue
Samsung flip phone, probably back
in, like, 2005. And even that
was 20 years after
the first ever cell phone the DynaTAC 8000x
was released. So this is not
the original box it came in, but inside this box
is the OG DynaTAC. Let's get into this. That's a lot of leather, and you actually get
a little leather smell. I hope that means
it's real leather. This is the DynaTAC in here. Good old Velcro. Whoa. That is crazy. And this is your
antenna-looking thing. It has a digital screen.
The buttons are pretty soft. It really does have
some heft to it. It'd be kinda funny to see
how many phones today would equal the thickness
of the DynaTAC.

One, two, three. Five, seven, ten
of today's smart phones thick. But that's how far we've come. If that isn't Moore's Law
for you, I don't know what is. This battery comes off. "May explode
if disposed in fire." Slide that back on. So these phones operated
on the very first wireless network
ever created, which we'll now
refer back to as 1G. 1G networks are not
still operational. They haven't been in,
like, 20 years, but I'm kinda thinking
of things that I think people would say
on 1980s phone calls. Hey, you gonna be
at jazzercise today, Bill? My fax should have
gone through by now.
Hopefully you got that. – Hey, are you home yet?
– Yeah, I just got here.

Can you set up the VCR
to record "Golden Girls"
on the VHS today? – For sure.
– I'm probably gonna miss it. Bill, relax.
I sent the fax. You'll get it soon, okay? It's hard to imagine
a time now
without a cell phone
in every pocket.
So I need to know,
how did the DynaTAC create
an entirely new world
of portable communication
where it didn't exist before? First of all, welcome.
Thanks for joining me. – Thank you, my friend.
– I want to start by asking you to check underneath
your chair. I can do that, I guess.

Oh! That's cra–
yo, I'm done. I'm done. Look how big this antenna is.
This is huge. Man, this phone is mad heavy. Like, if you ever
got into a problem, you could throw it at somebody
and actually win a fight. Like, this thing is just baller.
It's so cool! Marques:
So I want to take it back before the days
of any cellular phones. What was that world like? ( phones ringing ) Lisa:
Before there were cell phones,
you could make a phone call
from home
before you left your house. But if there was an emergency
or if your car broke down,
you had to use a pay phone.
– This is an emergency. Give me the local
fire department paramedics. Until the car phone came out. – ( phone ringing )
– Brad: Motorola was
this tech company,
and what Motorola was developing
were these car phones. The car phone
was the first mobile phone, and they were only mobile
in the sense that you could
fit them into your trunk. Announcer:
More and more people have
a phone in their car,
like this unique cellular
portable made by Motorola.
Michael:
They were massive, massive
pieces of equipment
that drew a lot of power. Announcer:
And they are a hot item.
A year from now,
every metropolitan area
of the nation will have
cellular phone service.
Brad:
So, the challenge
with the tech
was how to fit
all of the crap
in the trunk of the car, the antenna
on the top of the car,
into an actual portable
handheld cell phone.

There was a team within Motorola
led by Dr. Martin Cooper. Dr. Cooper emerged
as the leading proponent of,
"Hey, people are gonna
want to buy
portable cellular telephones. We need to build them. And we need to build them
in a massively short
amount of time."
Because they knew that
there was gonna be competition.
And I think
one of the engineers said, "Oh, that sounds great.
I'll get around to that." And Dr. Cooper said,
"You don't understand. We have to build this
in six weeks." What's crazy
is they were able to do it. Whoa. Marty Cooper and his team
at Motorola
were in a race
against rival phone company
Bell Laboratories
to come up with the world's
first cell phone.
So, who better to tell
that story
than the legend himself? Martin Cooper:
At the beginning,
it was a great curiosity. I don't think anybody
ever believed that everybody
would have them– except we did.

What was the first
phone call that you made after the successful creation of that first DynaTAC
prototype? I must tell you
that I hadn't planned on who I was gonna call. But walking down
6th Avenue in New York,
and it occurred to me, "Why don't I call
my counterpart?"
His name was Dr. Joel Angel
at Bell Laboratories.
And I said, "Hi, Joel.
This is Marty Cooper."
And he says, "Hi, Marty." "Joel, I'm calling you
from a cell phone.
But a real cell phone. A handheld personal
portable cell phone.
What do you think of that?" Silence on the other
end of the line.
I could only imagine
what he was thinking,
and I suspect he was
gritting his teeth.
And that's when things
took off.
Did you ever imagine
the technology advancing this far? Not a chance.

Today, there are more
portable phones in the world
than there are people. So we never could've
imagined that. Amazing. I can remember
the first phone I ever got, the first smartphone
I ever got, the first time I ever
pointed a camera at myself and talked about how much
I loved my new phone. All that stuff
comes from the DynaTAC, so I feel like I owe you
a thank you, too. You're very, very welcome. Marques:
The DynaTAC prototype
was nothing like anyone
had ever seen or sold before.
The end result
was 1.75 pounds,
stood 13 inches high, stored 30 numbers, took 10 hours to charge for about 30 minutes
of talk time,
and cost a hefty $3,995. Adjusted for inflation, that's over $10,000 today. By today's standards,
this might not seem impressive,
but in the early '80s,
the DynaTAC
was a groundbreaking
piece of technology,
and the very first
of its kind.
And in March of 1984,
the DynaTAC 8000X
officially hit the market. And this is it.

This is a portable
cellular phone. When people got hold of the first portable
cellular telephone,
they didn't want
to put them down.
They became addicted
to that convenience. I think it's the greatest thing
that I've ever had, and it's something
that I wanted somebody to come up with
for a long time. Brad:
So, after the DynaTAC
comes out,
cell phones do blow up,
but it's a limited blow-up because these phones
were so expensive.
The prevailing attitude
at the time was how are you gonna get people to buy a $4,000 handset? This is gonna be a toy
for the rich
and nobody's gonna
buy the thing.
( tires squeal ) Brad:
But once pop culture started
pushing this stuff out,
people were buying
these phones to show out. Very famously, of course,
the film "Wall Street"
featured the phone, and I remember thinking
as a kid, "Wow, I really
want one of those.
It looks like
it makes you cool."
I don't care
where or how you get it, just get it. And there was
"Saved by the Bell." The Zack Morris phone.

I'm, I guess, a little young. I don't think I've ever seen
"Saved By The Bell." – Who is Zack Morris?
– What? And what is
the Zack Morris phone? All right. "Saved By The Bell"
was an iconic
mid-'90s television show
where Zack Morris
essentially terrorizes
everyone in the school. He would have this phone, making calls
and doing deals,
and essentially
putting his friends
in very precarious
predicaments all the time.
I'd like to order
a large pizza and the hottest peppers
you can find. When kids saw Zack Morris
using a cell phone, we talked about that phone. Like, "Yo, we want that." Lisa:
That was when we really
started to see
the DynaTAC 8000X
entering the mainstream for the everyday person. Marques:
Four decades after
the DynaTAC 8000X
was first released,
mobile phones have become
the most used electronic
device in the world.
But these last 40 years
haven't been without
some questionable designs
along the way.
So, we have with us
some of the most interesting and unique designs
from that time, and we also have
fellow YouTuber and friend Austin Evans to help
take a look at those.

Austin has reviewed tech
for over a decade on YouTube,
and he especially loves
all things cellular.
…to this. This is "Dope Or Nope." All right, let's take
a look at the first one. This is called the Motorola
StarTAC Rainbow. – Is this from
the '90s, perhaps?
– This is from 1998. Go ahead and flip this open. Oh, wow.
It's actually original. – Yeah.
– I think '90s are still cool. There was
a matte black version
that you didn't get. You got the rainbow version. – What? Wait.
– That is sick. It looks like you made it
out of Play-Doh. I like the look
of this phone. – It's so '90s, it's so cool.
– And you got plenty of– Oh, God, you're
probably about to mount
this to your belt.

I am– you read my mind. – Aw.
– Pretty sure I count
as a dad now, right? – That's the SIM card.
– This is the SIM card? Oh, it even has the cut-out.
Oh, wow. See, but it feels so che–
( gasps ) ( laughs ) Sorry, I'm getting a call.
One moment. – Are you getting a call?
– Just let me make sure I'm– – Yeah.
– He's got it. No, the GameBoy's
gonna be big, yeah. Yeah, we should buy. Marques: All right,
so I think we should place our bets on the price,
'cause I don't know the price of this one.
I think this is $400. Oh, I was gonna say $400.
I agree. Okay. The price tag
is on the bottom of the box. ( laughing ) Starting price, $1,000. This cost $1,000? For a thousand bucks
to feel this cheap
is simply unacceptable. Good-bye. Gosh.
I hate talking to you. That's a nope. So, this next one is called
the Siemens Xelibri 6, and all I know about it
is that it was targeted for the female demographic. And that is it. It's like a compact, right? Uh, what is that? Like a–
like a makeup thing.

This is that,
but without the makeup. I think if we boot this up, we can see what
the screens are about. ( music playing ) Oh, oh. Okay, I'm losing all
my respect for this phone. So, we have what I assume
is signal flashing here, and then your battery life
is your heart. So, dude,
I have one heart left. So many bad ideas
in such a small space.

Pictures.
Oh, let's look at pictures. Cake.bmp. What if these are all
pre-loaded photos that you could send to people
because they were already in your library
as a reaction, kind of like the way
we use emojis right now? – Hmm.
– That's cool. But, like, what is–
what is this? What is this?
Like, who am I,
really, right now? This is clearly designed
by a bunch of dudes
who are like, "Oh, you know what women
are gonna love? This." There's a lengthy list
of possible pros and cons, – mostly cons for this phone.
– Mm-hmm.

This is definitely,
I'm gonna say, missing the mark. So, the Xelibri 6,
that's a nope. Austin:
That's a nope for me. All right, so,
this next one comes
to us from Nokia. This one was dubbed
the Lipstick Phone,
and that is… – Oh, word.
– …this here. This is totally
from "Star Wars." You mean, like
a lightsaber, kind of? Austin: Yeah, yeah! ( gasps ) A camera! – Is that a camera?
– Yes! Whoa, it's got a click wheel. So, dude, this thing
is actually really cool. The UI must be wild. Okay, I think
we have to turn it on. Can you find a power button
is the question? – What about this one?
– There's, like, zero descriptors
on this at all.

There's not, like, one word
besides the word "Nokia" on it. Marques: Wait,
what is happening right now? Okay, so, think 2000s.
Think. Is there a button
on the side? There's a couple buttons, but none of these
are screaming – power button at me.
– Wait, no. Austin: Hey! Marques:
The red button turns it on. Oh, look at that.
We've got a full color display. Wow. So you're just meant
to use it in landscape. Marques: But I need to see
what this camera looks like. I mean, I'm sure
it's not going to be great. It's 2004, like, whatever.
Set and… – Not bad, not bad.
– Other phones have T9. You have a keyboard
for a reason. You don't have
a keyboard on this phone, so if you're texting,
you're texting
with that wheel. – Good luck.
– Okay, just take a step back.

– Mm-hmm.
– Okay, put yourself in 2004. Look at how cool this looks. I just don't think
I can give this dope – because it's not–
– Really? Maybe because I'm not
a huge lipstick guy. I don't know what it is. Yeah, Nokia 7280
for me is a nope. Well, it gets
a certified dope from me. Awesome, well, thank you
for taking that journey
with me, Austin.

– Of course, man. Any time.
– I appreciate it. "Dope Or Nope," signing out. Marques:
Since the DynaTAC's
release in 1983,
thousands of unique
cell phone models
have circulated the world. And in my personal
pockets alone,
I've owned and tested several
hundred different models.
But this cell phone boom
wasn't immediate.
It took years
after the DynaTAC's release
for the cost of cell phones
to drop down far enough
in order to be accessible
for most people.
So, in the mid-1980s, that's
when a much cheaper device
was introduced
to the mainstream.
Enter the pager. Announcer: Get the pager.
It's affordable,
it's portable, from Motorola. Boom. The pager dropped. Michael:
And a pager was just a little
box you wore on your belt,
and it would buzz
when people called
a specific number,
your pager number.
So if a friend
was at a payphone,
they could call
your pager number
and then you would call
that payphone back.
You were immediately
reachable.
You didn't have to go home
to get your messages from your answering machine.

Gerard: So, now that
the pager dropped,
it's like, yo,
it ain't a cell phone,
but it's still something that we can use
to communicate with. A lot of people
in the hood–
like, hip-hop, music, entertainers,
once it got into that world,
everything started
to explode and change. You can't be a hip-hop fan
and not know the beginning
of Biggie Smalls' "Warning," which is just the beep… ( beeping ) – And then…
– ♪ Who the hell is this ♪ ♪ Paging me at 5:46
in the morning ♪
♪ Crack of dawn
and now I'm yawning ♪
When that happened,
you had to have a pager.

Man, gotta spin the chain
on that, baby. Lisa:
Pagers were everywhere,
and people developed
their own language
to communicate through pagers. Michael:
You don't have to put
a phone number in there,
you can put in whatever
numbers you want.
So people started
sending coded messages. Lisa:
It kind of lead to
this whole vernacular
very similar to the way
we have our own language
when we text people today with emojis and bitmojis
and things like that.

The pager gave birth
to texting. Marques:
So, in the '80s and '90s,
pagers were a convenient option
because phone booths
were on every corner.
But today,
in New York City,
there are only
three phone booths left.
So I'm here at one of them at the corner of 90th Street
and West End Ave.,
where I'm waiting for a page from fellow YouTube creator
Sara Dietschy.
On her channel, Sara's always
tackling new tech,
so hopefully we can figure out
the pager together.
I'm leaving my phone number.

I guess now I have to wait
for him to call me back. ( beeping ) That's jarring. Oh, I hold it down
to see the number. – ( dial tone )
– Dial tone. – Hello?
Hey. This is the first page
I have literally ever sent. This is the first page
I've ever received, also. Voice: Please insert 25 cents
for another three minutes.
Sounds like a rip-off. Before this call disconnects,
let's just meet at the studio and figure out
this whole pager thing. ( click ) I hope she got that. All right, so,
we're back at the studio. I'm just kind of curious
in general, like, what do
you know about pagers? I've seen it in
one episode of "Friends" when Ross got a pager
when his kid was being born.

So, for, like,
emergencies, right? – "Call me."
– Important messages. – Yeah.
– Something like that. So, I've been told
that there's a certain thing
called pager codes. Back in the day,
people would send each other
strings of numbers
as a messaging system,
– kind of like an early text.
– A text message, okay.
Marques: In codes. What we're gonna
try to do is decode what sort of message
we just received. We have the answers here,
and we have our little – whiteboards here.
– Feel like I'm back at school. We'll try to see
if we can figure out,
against each other, if one of us can get it right. You're going down. I mean, I'm not
confident at all, so I– Me neither, so I don't
know why I said that. I'm just gonna go ahead
and give it a shot. – Ooh.
– ( beeping ) – That's so loud.
– Okay.

– Can you not?
– And awful. – Sara: 707.
– Oh, that's easy. Done. Yes. I finished that first. Yeah. Yeah. – Dang it!
– But I got it first. Hold on, so you're telling me
people in the '80s were the ones
who came up with LOL? Yeah, that predated
texting, I guess. – Wow.
– Next page. Next page, please. ( beeping ) – I just want that to stop.
– Mm-hmm. – 187.
– Interesting. – 187.
– Seven. I feel like these codes,
there's so much more thought that's put into it than,
like, LOL. – You're distracting me
from my answer.
– I'm so sorry. – Ready?
– Yep. I'm the late one. And I got that by– when I turned it
upside down, I got L-8-1. Yeah, this is truly horrible. What did you get? "I am hungry." – Like, "ate," food.
– Yeah. And then I would probably
text this to people.

But then, like,
who is hungry? I got the text
from an unknown– an unknown source is hungry. I don't think
either of us is right. No, I don't think so either. All right.
"I hate you. You're dead." – That's so mean.
– "You're–" What? What? Sara:
"Police code for murder." Why would anyone know that? "Uh, we got a 187 over here on Northwest
Broadway Street." That's what people
are paging each other? – Yep.
– I guess it give me
an appreciation for how creative you had
to get to send a message.

– ( beeping )
– This is the last one. – This is the last page.
– Yep. – Okay, one, dash.
– Dash. I love how we want to do it
at the same time. One– 1-177155-400. – So that's probably
three words.
– Ooh! – Do you know
what it is already?
– I have no idea. This is something
you would page someone. I'm pretty sure I'm wrong.
I just wrote this down as a bail-out
answer because…

I am so unconfident. – Ready?
– Yep. I picked the police
codes category. I picked the turning it
upside down, and the only thing
I saw was "ill." – So, "I'm sick."
– Ill? Where's "ill"? Oh, 177? – Wait.
– That's "L-L-I." – I am just confused.
– Upside down and backwards. – I am utterly confused.
– So, look, we're both
probably wrong. – Reveal!
– This is the final answer. – "I miss you."
– What? I miss you. I miss you? Oh! Wow. It was spelling it out
right-ways. It was spelling it out. It was right
in front of our face. The 177 makes an "M." – Now it's so obvious…
– Yes. now that you can see the "M." But thank goodness
for technology, because this is insane. Marques:
I think we both learned
what it was like – to have a pager in the '80s.
– Yeah. It's kind of funny.
This might even be further ahead of its time
than the DynaTAC was, just because if you
have a quick message you want to say, like,
"Hey, you're dead to me," you might just make a little
text message out of it instead of calling them up
and saying it.
Thank you for taking
the journey with me.

Thank you so much, Marques. – I'm glad we did this.
– Sara: Same. Marques:
Of course, nowadays
you can send texts
and make phone calls
on one device,
but the ways in which
we use our cell phones
are still evolving to this day,
40 years later.
What is the legacy
of the DynaTAC? And then what is
the legacy of pagers?
Lisa: Mobile phones
are the most used
electronic device
in the world.
Without the DynaTAC,
without this idea
that you wanted to take
your phone calls with you,
who knew
if there would be the idea that we wanted to take
everything else with us, too? Gerard: The DynaTAC created
a new level of relationships.
Relationship happens
through connection,
so the better
you can create something that allows us
to connect better
is groundbreaking.

Michael:
Compared to the DynaTAC,
I think pagers
have a less visible history, but they pioneered
this era of text first. Nobody talks
on phones anymore.
Everyone texts,
and pagers were the first embryonic form of that. Brad:
The age breakdowns
work as well,
where it's, like,
younger kids are just texting,
and then our old parents
always want to call us for no good reason. Today, we look at this and say,
"What a brick." But you can't have
our current information age without the technological
innovation
that the DynaTAC started. It's a massively important
piece of history.
Not just communication
history– history.
Marques:
So, wow, this was such
a fun one to throw back to,
because this one
I feel like is the legacy
that I'm most familiar with. Before mobile phones, before this communication
that has spread so far, the amount of people you could
have a conversation with or could connect with at all
was much more limited.
But now that almost
everyone can have some sort
of mobile phone, it sort of shrinks the world,
and allows you and everyone to communicate with
more people than ever before
at any other point
in history.
So thank you
for your dedication, Dr.

Marty Cooper. Thank you, Motorola. Thank you, DynaTAC 8000X. And thank you for watching. Peace..

As found on YouTube

Sony Xperia 1 review: a tall order

The thing that I like about Android is there can be so many
different kinds of phones, just a lot of weird choices. But lately, it seems like
there are really only two choices, at least in terms of screen size. There's regular and there's extra large, which is why I was so excited
to try this phone right here, the Sony Xperia 1. I mean, just look at this good tall boy. It's got a 21:9 aspect ratio, which makes it relatively
narrow and super, well, tall. I think it's a fascinating phone, and it's way nicer than
I expected it to be. But I don't think it can
really justify its $950 price. Let me tell you why. Now, a lot of people would
like to have a big-screened phone, but they're put off by
how big these phones feel.

And that's the reason I like the Xperia 1. It has a big screen, there
is no doubt about it. It's 6.5 inches. But it's quite a bit narrower
than this OnePlus 7 Pro here. So you get the benefits of
seeing more stuff on your screen, like on the web or on Twitter, without the drawback of
feeling like you have a big honking glass slab you can barely wrap your fingers around. This phone is also really good if you like to do split-screen apps, which… I don’t know, I guess
people still do that. I never do. Anyway, it's nicer to hold, but that doesn't make
it a one-handed phone by any stretch of the imagination.

You're still going to need
to use your second hand to reach the top of the screen. Sony has a couple of
software tricks that help with how tall this phone is, but neither of them are great. You can double tap the home button to make a smaller version of the screen. Or there's this other thing with… Er, wow. What are you
doing there, Chuckles? Huh. Sorry, let's back up. Or you're supposed to be able to tap either side of the screen or swipe on it to do other stuff. It's called Side Sense,
and it kind of sucks. I can never get it to
work when I want it to, and it pops up all of the time when I don't want it to.

Now the reason that Sony
says it made this phone at this weird, tall aspect ratio is for watching movies, and Sony says that it
has a 4K HDR OLED screen. It also has, quote, “professional
level color reproduction.” So it can be in the DCI-P3 color gamut. It can also be in the BT.2020 color space if you care about that. And it has the D65 white point. There's this whole “Creator Mode” thing. Basically, Sony is
trying to make this phone appeal to people who really
care about video quality, both watching it and recording it. But Sony, the thing is, if you're going to do that, this screen should get way brighter. It is way more dim compared
to other OLED screens. Anyway, yeah, I will say
watching a 21:9 movie on this phone with its Dolby
stuff, without letterboxing or weird camera cutouts, is great. But the truth is that most
of the video that I watch is not 21:9.

It’s stuff on YouTube, and so I still end up
having big black bars on the left or the right. Or, if I expand it full screen, I end up cutting off people's heads. Now, I do think this phone is pretty good from a build quality perspective. It's got Gorilla Glass and IP68. It's got some bezels,
but they're not too big, and it's just nice to hold. But, you know, of course
there's no headphone jack. But there's no getting around how it being this tall
makes it really awkward. It's so tall, it couldn't
fit in my pocket. I was sitting down, and it just slid right out of my pocket and clattered on the concrete, which is why there are dings on the edges of the
phone on our review unit, which is sad. The buttons are also awkward.

They're all on the right side of the phone and, I don’t know, the fingerprint sensor is separate from the power
button for some reason. And sometimes it gets a little dirty and you have to wipe it off
before it will actually work. I do like that there is
a dedicated camera button. But overall, when I'm
trying to use this phone, I just end up hitting the wrong button, like, all of the time.

On the back, there are
three 12-megapixel cameras. There's a regular, a 2X
telephoto, and a wide. Sony put some nice optical
image stabilization on the main lens, and you know what? Finally, Sony has made
a phone with a camera that's pretty good. It's not quite as good as a Pixel 3 or a OnePlus 7 Pro to my eyes, but it's finally respectable.

I do wish that the
telephoto was more than 2X, but the wide angle one, it's really fun. I kind of love it. But I don't love Sony's camera software. The wide angle thing makes you pick between prioritizing image
quality or distortion. The auto made doesn't do HDR by default, and there's just a bunch of other settings that just really look
and feel kind of silly. Anyway, let's get into the results of what I actually get
out of these lenses. I think that Sony
prefers leaving detail in, even though that also
leaves in a bunch of noise. It also doesn't do as
aggressive HDR as I would like unless you have to, you
know, manually turn it on.

But the thing that did surprise me is that even though there's
no dedicated night mode, sometimes it actually
really nails it anyway, even if it's incredibly dark. Now, you can shoot 4K, and
that's one of the reasons this phone exists. And so Sony also
included a Cinema Pro app that lets you really dial
in all these manual settings for shooting 4K video. Unfortunately, the 8-megapixel camera on the front is junk.

It's really not good. I don't know, man. If this phone didn't cost $950, I'd probably be a little
bit less nit-picky, but you know what? It does. So I am. In terms of software and performance, I actually don't have a ton of complaints. It's a fairly clean version of Android 9 with just a few bells and whistles. It has a Snapdragon 855 processor so it's fast, and there's 6GB of RAM, which is decent, but not stellar. I am a little bit grumpy that there's only one storage option:
128GB of storage. If you're going to want more, and especially if you're
going to want to shoot 4K, you're going to need to expand it. And you can because there's
a microSD card slot. Battery life is
average-ish for big phones. I'm getting over four hours of screen time, and it's lasting through a day, but there's only a 3,300mAh battery in here, and I kind of feel like that's not enough.

I would be happier with that if there was wireless
charging on this phone. But no, there's not. It does do fast charging, but one neat thing Sony does is it won't fast-charge when it knows that you’re charging overnight, which helps with the overall
life span of the battery, which means it should last longer, a year or two for now — at least in theory. Now, after all that, if you're still interested in this phone, you should also know
that Sony as a company has kind of been deemphasizing phones since it hasn't been
really successful with them in the past few years.

And that kind of makes sense, and I also think it makes sense for Sony to try something new and move into this niche
of making tall boys, like this guy right here. Now, of course, you can spend less money and get a better phone
like the OnePlus 7 Pro, but what you can't get is any other phone in this tall aspect ratio, so I like the idea of this form factor. I think that it should exist in
the world of Android phones. So I'm glad that Sony's
trying to make 21:9 happen. But I don't know that I'd
recommend this particular phone to anybody. If you really, really,
really love the tall screen or you really love what
Sony does with video, then maybe.

But there's no getting around the fact that this is an expensive phone. For $950, I expect more,
and you should, too. Hey, thank you for watching. Do you want a tall phone? Let me know in the comments below. Also, if you're wondering if
there are other tall phones, we did review the Xperia 10 last month. It's kind of the same idea but cheaper and also, it's really bad for a whole other set of reasons.

But if you want to see a
review of a good big phone, click here..

As found on YouTube