This Phone has a LASER PROJECTOR built in?!

So a company called Blackview released a brand
new phone – for sale right now – that has a full-on projector in the top. Talk about crazy features. Today we're going to be durability testing
the Blackview Max 1 to see if it can handle every day life and see what this projector
is all about. Spoiler alert – the projector is a bit better
than you think it is. Let's get started. [Intro] So obviously, projectors need to be operated
in kind of a dark environment. They're not as bright as say a TV. But with one click, the Max 1 is activated
shooting the projector out the back. And right now we're about 2 meters away and
this is the equivalent of a 45 inch TV, which is incredible, especially since it's coming
out the top of a cell phone.

It's a laser projector with the resolution
of 720p, but it's interesting because you can just take it anywhere. It's in your pocket and you can use it at
a moment's notice where ever you want. Every now and then you might catch a line
in the video you're watching flickering down the projection, but that's only because of
the camera I'm using to film this phone. In real life it doesn't appear when you're
watching the projection. It has something to do with the camera shutter
speed or something like that. Here's another example with a little drone
history video that I made. This was me filming with the DJI Mavic Pro
2 out in the middle of Idaho with the wrecked plane in the woods.

Kind of an interesting video…I'll link that
if you want to take a look at it. It's crazy to me that they fit a laser projector
in the top of this phone, and it's displaying on the wall behind me. Some phone companies are like, oh, we don't
have room for a headphone hack, and then Blackview's over here putting an entire projector. So whether you want to watch movies or play
video games, what's cool about this is that it can actually display whatever's on your
cellphone behind you or on the ceiling of your room as you're using this phone. And it's super funny that Apple produced the
iPod for, you know, $300, and then there's this phone for almost the same price that
has a full fledged projector in it. It just goes to show you that your dollar
goes a much longer way with Android than it does with Apple. Blackview does say that while you're using
the projector, it can project for 5 hours before the battery goes down, which is pretty
impressive. So we've talked a bit about the features,
but you know we're really here to find out if it's durable or not.

Let's start with the scratch test. It's hard to get over how cool this phone
is. Quite possibly one of the coolest, or at least
the most unique phones of 2019. On the Blackview website, the Max 1 is being
sold for $400 with the caveat that it only works in Europe and Asia right now. That might change in the future, of course. But either way, it's pretty cheap. This might come as a surprise to nobody, but
the Blackview Max 1 starts scratching at a level 6 with deeper grooves at a level 7. The earpiece is made from metal with just
one thin row of circles just to let the sound through. There are 2 cameras on the front, both protected
by the front glass, a 16 megapixel front camera with a secondary depth sensor. The right side of the phone is pretty standard
– metal construction with a textured metal power button and a plain metal volume rocker.

The top is where the real party happens. Still all made from metal up here which is
good. But then when I go to analyze the rectangular
opening for the laser projector, it's made from plastic. Yeah, it is recessed below the frame so it
should be protected from scratches most of the time. But since plastic does scratch easier than
glass, special cleaning precautions should be taken when wiping off the surface. The left side of the Max 1 is pretty plain,
minus the removable SIM and SD card tray – huge fan of that.

It's very easy to transfer SD cards full of
movies. The bottom of the phone has a loudspeaker
grill, USB-C port, and no headphone jack. But since they stuffed an entire full projector
into the top of the phone, I think we can make an exception this time around. The back panel is made from glass with the
Blackview logo printed on the underside, which won't scratch off. The camera lens housing is made from metal,
and the circular lens protecting the 16 megapixel sensor is thankfully made from glass.

The fingerprint scanner is scratchable. After some heavy abuse it can still read my
finger, but then when I go to unlock the phone, it does not work every single time. The phone does get a little warm when the
screen is turned on and it's projecting at the same time. Not as warm as when I hold my lighter up to
it of course, but the little device is doing a whole lot of work when it's projecting. Luckily the internal 4680 milliamp hour battery
is there to handle the extra workload. It can supposedly project for 5 hours at a
time. Even after 40 seconds under the flame from
my lighter, nothing was really happening to the 6 inch 1080p AMOLED display…just a yellowish
tinge to the pixels, but they eventually recovered and the yellow tinge went away. To turn the projector on, it's just one click,
and then whatever's on your screen starts popping out the top.

Blackview claims their projector can make
a 200 inch screen, but I think it would be pretty washed out at that point. In a totally dark room, I think about 40 or
50 inches is plenty good enough. Good enough, of course, with the stipulation
that the phone is structural and can handle the abuse of everyday life. When bent from the back, there is no flex
with the phone. It's a pretty thick little guy with over 10
millimeters, which is 3 millimeters thicker than the iPhone 10s, but it definitely doesn't
budge. It's hard to argue with a super thick brick
phone construction. I was honestly getting kind of bored with
the smart phones of 2018, but here in 2019 with all of it's motorized cameras, internal
projectors, and time-of-flight cameras, and super high internal optical zoom cameras,
it's turning out to be a fantastic year for smart phones.

The Blackview Max 1 passes my durability test. It'll be super fun to see what that projector
component looks like from the inside. This phone is just yet another example of
if you want a phone that does cool stuff, you just have to pay less money for it. Would you every use a projector if it came
built-in to your phone? Let me know down in the comments. Hit that subscribe button if you haven't already. I will be taking this thing apart. And come hang out with me on Instagram and
Twitter. Thanks a ton for watching. I'll see you around..

As found on YouTube

LG Wing Teardown! – HOW DOES IT WORK?!

the lg wing is probably one of the most unique devices we've seen all year or maybe even of all time it's one of those devices that well blazes its own trail without really stopping to ask for directions and i'm all for it this is a pre-production unit sent to me by lg so it's not a retail unit the durability test has to wait until that comes out like we always do but the hardware is finalized so we can take it all apart to see how it works huge thanks to lg for sponsoring this video and sending over the wing rather brave them since i've never opened up a phone like this before and there's a pretty good chance it won't survive let's get started the lg wing has about the same size shape thickness and weight as my note 10 plus inside of its case but the lg wing can do this which is something i never thought a phone would need to do instead of folding this guy swivels it'll be super interesting to see how that works from the inside the phone splits in half swiveling up into a t-shape so the screen is horizontal while revealing a secondary square screen down below the swinging motion feels solid and really easy to initiate and something catches the screen at the top of the swivel to gently ease it into place we're going to find out how the hinge works once we get inside lg has installed a high lubricity polyacetyl which is a lubricated plastic source that surrounds the front panel and protects the screen it's a softer smoother plastic raised up to form a slight cavern inside so foreign materials won't be rubbing up on the screen when it's closed or opening this is important because pocket sand is a real danger to glass displays when the phone is opened up in its wing to state there is more real estate for activities and multitasking like with youtube it displays the video up top and the video controls down below or when we're in the camera app the bottom display can act as a gimbal for the camera unit adding extra electronic stabilization to the camera there is no physical movement of the camera hardware while you're controlling that gimbal it's all done with software but still pretty cool activating the top camera makes it pop out of the phone like a daisy and then the wing can film forwards and backwards at the same time it also has the same retract and fall detection features that we've seen in other pop-up cameras the coolest thing though i think is the ability to watch a video full screen while another app like texting is open at the bottom or even the ability to comment on a video while it's still full screen or maybe while you're on a road trip the navigation can be vertical while the music is over on the side screen there are a lot of different options i mean let's be honest this probably isn't going to be the best phone to recommend to grandma but if you're looking for the latest craziest and most uniquely designed phone on the market this might very well just be it now that the wing has been awake for five minutes it's time to take it apart so keep in mind that this is my first time seeing the lg wing and it is very different from any other phone we've taken apart recently so cross your fingers for our new friend's survival dlg wing has passed nine different mil standard 810g tests one of which is the shock test which dropped the wing at 26 different angles from 1.2 meters and it still survived but that's obviously quite a bit different than being completely dismantled i'll remove the back glass panel since that's where i'd assume we'd find the screen and internal connectors along with whatever magic makes up that swivel hinge with the back glass gone we get our first look at the wireless charging pad and the no dogs allowed sticker which is good since i'm not a canine i'll continue there are nine normal phillips head screws holding down the top plastics and once that panel is removed we get our first tease at how lg has assembled the wing we know ribbon cables can flex you know from those pop-up cameras and this ribbon cable controlling the screen goes through the pcb and rotates gently with the display inside of its large smooth circular opening lg says they've tested this opening motion over 200 000 times which like if you flipped open the phone 100 times a day would still last you about five and a half years so far so good we can also get a close-up look at the pop-up front-facing camera it's got the same stepper motor setup that we've seen other pop-up cameras use i used to dedicate an entire video to a pop-up camera but now we've got whole phones splitting in half technology's pretty great i'll disconnect the battery the bottom screen the usb-c charging port cable all just like little legos then i'll pull out the sim and expandable memory sd card tray you might think that a phone like this wouldn't have any water protection and you're kind of right the phone isn't exactly sealed shut but lg has coated the internal boards with a water repellent coating there's still no official ip rating so keep it away from water but it is nice to know it does have some protection i'll lift the motherboard out from the phone after disconnecting the 32 megapixel front-facing camera there are three rear-facing cameras the 12-megapixel swivel camera up top a 64 megapixel main camera which does have optical image stabilization and a 13 megapixel wide angle camera down at the bottom the top camera does the whole gimbal thing that i showed you earlier with its built-in electronic stabilization there is a small thermal pad on the back which helps transfer heat away from the processor into the frame of the phone i'll take the battery out next before we try to remove the wing there is an incredibly reasonable amount of adhesive holding the battery down no magic pull tabs but it does pop up easily with my pry tool thumbs up for that it has a four thousand milliamp hour capacity we have a few more revelations about that hinge from this vantage point the little doohickey that cushions the hinge opening is right here next the display ribbon it's the smallest hydraulic damper i've ever seen hydraulic shocks are common on trucks and off-roading vehicles to help cushion the impact of the vehicle while off-roading and here we have the babiest of the baby shocks inside of the lg wing if we can get an awe down in the comments that would be great we'll get a closer look at that guy in just a second in order to get the front screen off i imagine it has something to do with these six large phillips head screws after those are gone i can tell the screen wants to come away from the phone but it's still connected somehow i'm trying to be gentle since i never really asked lg if they wanted this phone back alive or not but they also didn't tell me how to open it so here we are after a lot of unfruitful jiggling and wiggling i realized that the screen itself had a little hole in its sliding mechanism kind of like how we would find in a hotel room chain door lock and once i got those internal screws removed it gets loose enough so the hole can be lined up and popped off the body of the phone i used to you know tell my mom that video games would help me learn problem solving skills that i could use as an adult and i don't think this is exactly what she had in mind but i'm still counting it there are nine black screws holding the hinge of the super thin top display and once those are gone we finally get our full complete view of the lg wing hinge the rest of the hinge components are riveted together which makes sense because what's left inside are two pretty powerful springs one that helps the phone open and hold it open and the other that holds it in the closed position both equally balanced so that the swiveling motion itself is easy the large hole in the center is for that ribbon cable the two curved sections you see on the hinge are for the double locking mechanism that keeps the screen from opening too far in either direction and having two of them both made out of metal helps keep the screen strongly positioned parallel to the rest of the foam body it looks like our itty bitty hydraulic damper is held in place with three tiny screws of its own i'll pop those out and pull away our tic-tac-size little friend it's amazing how small this thing is the same technology that keeps the screen door from slamming shut is now inside of a cell phone 2020 has been pretty wild speaking of wild it's going to be really crazy if i can get this whole thing put back together and functioning again i'll feed the top display through the hinge and get that screwed down the top display is 6.8 inches and the bottom display which is still attached to the frame is just about four inches getting the curved metal guiding slot in the screen lined up with the metal post on the foam body is probably the trickiest part of the reassembly but once i feel it get clicked in everything else just falls into place exactly how it should and i can attach the spring portion of the swivel hinge back to the frame from the inside everything else is relatively normal just like a regular phone the motherboard goes back in with this pop-up camera and all of the little lego style ribbon attachments get clipped in i'll lay the battery in place and get the wing screen ribbon connected then i can attach the wireless charging and protective backed plastics with the screws and trust me i'm just as surprised as you are the whole thing still turns on and functions like normal not too shabby i'm impressed at lg's leap of innovation the wing brings some exciting diversity to an otherwise rather boring sea of rectangles and i think it's pretty cool i'm curious to hear your thoughts about the wing down in the comments we'll do a durability test when the retail version comes out to keep things consistent i am glad that lg gave us an early look inside though hit that subscribe button if you haven't already coming out with me on instagram and twitter and thanks a ton for watching i'll see you around you

As found on YouTube

Dual Screen Smartphone? – Front AND Rear Displays Tested!

So here's a new one for you, a smartphone
with two screens. This is the Nubia X โ€“ an Android smartphone
that comes with two built in screens, one on the front, and one on the back. You know we couldn't let this one slip by
without a full on durability test. Let's get started. [Intro] So supposedly if you want to work this contraption,
there are two fingerprint readers on the sides that when gripped allow whatever's displayed
on the front screen to slip over onto the back panel while retaining full functionality. You can run the whole phone from back here. When the rear screen is turned off, it looks
just like a normal phone.

Let's see what happens when we scratch test
both screens. This Nubia X comes with a builtin screen protector
which is nice. I'll pull that off. The interesting thing with this phone is that
there's no notch, there's no front facing cameras or sensors that need to be hidden,
which allows the whole front of the phone to light up edge to edge, as a display with
pretty much no bezels. As we see from the scratch test, the front
is made with tempered glass, scratching at a level 6, with deeper grooves at a level
7. We've got to be fair to both screens though. I'll grip the sides and flip it around. The rear screen has a much lower refresh rate
than the front screen, and has kind of a yellow tinge to it. It's also covered with a screen protector. I've found that the yellowness is just a blue
light filter that can be removed. I'll show you that in a second. The blue backing on the phone is kind of like
reflective film that acts as a 2-way mirror, that hides the second screen when it's turned
off.

And once again we get scratches at a level
6, with deeper grooves at a level 7. The rear screen is covered with the same glass. Part of what makes the front screen so bezel-less
is how small this earpiece is. I almost missed it. It's barely the thickness of my razor blade. The sides of the phone sound and look like
anodized aluminum. You can see the silver color shining through
under the blue coating, even here on the blue power button. One possible weak point in the frame is this
flattened portion where the fingerprint scanner resides.

It looks suspiciously like the design flaw
we saw on the iPad Pro, and we know how that one turned out. This phone has 2 of them, one on either side. I'm kind of nervous. The top of the phone has more metal and what
looks like an IR blaster up top for changing the channels on your TV. On the other side we have the SIM card tray,
volume rocker, and another flattened fingerprint reader…because why have just one fingerprint
reader when you can have two? Two is kind of the theme of this phone.

There are 2 SIM card slots as well, which
pair nicely with the two screens. Just one USB-C port down here at the bottom
alongside the loudspeaker holes. You might be thinking to yourself, 'Jerry,
why in the world would anyone want two screens on their phone?' Well let me tell you. There are no front facing cameras on the Nubia
X, just these two dual rear cameras: a 16 megapixel and 24 megapixel. One regular and the other one for that portrait
mode stuff. So when you want to take a selfie, you get
to use the powerful rear facing cameras while seeing your face at the same time. It's an interesting solution to the notch
problem, but also a solution that actually works. I'm impressed with the ingenuity โ€“ I genuinely
did not see this one coming. Like dual everything else on the phone, there
are two fingerprint scanners. You can use one or set up both for added security. And even with the damage inflicted on the
right side, the phone can still sense and unlock my fingerprint. Not too shabby, but at least there's a backup
if one ever fails. Now here's where things get interesting.

This front screen is a 6.2 inch 1080p IPS
LCD, meaning that after about 10 seconds we see the pixels getting hot, turning off and
going black, until the heat is removed, and then they slowly recover. They do recover completely though. Checking the back screen though, is where
we see one of the brilliant parts of the Nubia X design. An LCD screen when turned on has light shining
through every single pixel, even the black ones. So the whole display lights up. An LED screen or an AMOLED screen does not
have light shining through the black pixels, so you really can't tell when the screen is
on or off because the blacks are so black and emit no light. The Nubia X is using a 5.1 720p AMOLED screen
on the back, an LCD on the front, and AMOLED for the rear. You can see the pixels going white and not
recovering. Both technologies on one single device โ€“ burn
test justification. Checkmate on the haters.

The rear screen can act like an always-on
display without showing the actual edges of the screen. This provides the aesthetic illusion that
there's no screen at all on the back panel. Whether the screen is lit up or not, you can't
really see the rectangular edges due to the super black AMOLED pixels. It's interesting how all these innovative
smartphones keep popping up out of nowhere. No complaints from me. Here's a quick look at the rear display with
the blue light filter turned off. It looks completely normal and has as good
of quality as the front screen. I'm not sure why the Nubia X had that setting
turned on right out of the box. I think it looks pretty good. All of these awesome gimmicks though mean
nothing if the phone can't survive in your pocket for a few years. Here on my channel we put phones through years
of abuse in just a few minutes. It's time for the bend test. The dual fingerprint design on both side rails
might just be fatal.

With a solid flex from the front, we get minimal
bend, but no catastrophic damage, creeks or snaps. The rear screen looks fine. Even when bent from the front, the phone remains
intact and fully functional. No complaints here. The Nubia X is a structurally solid device,
even with all that fragile tech packed in, and while having screens on both sides, this
phone survives. As a side note, if one screen does actually
break, you can always just use the other as a back up since it does come with two. Do you think this phone is the future? Is a dual screen phone a better solution than
a motorized front facing camera? Which one do you prefer? Back to back screens are definitely fascinating. Hit that subscribe button if you haven't already. And come hang out with me on Instagram and
Twitter.

Thanks a ton for watching. I'll see you around..

As found on YouTube