WHITE Razer Blade + Razer Phone 2!!

Hello everyone, this is D2D Razer just released a brand new product Including a new mobile phone and several new notebooks Their newly released phone is Razer Phone 2 The Razer phone 1 released last year has a similar design to this year’s newly released phone But they also revised a lot this year Last year's Razer phone had a super fast 120Hz screen But the screen brightness is unsatisfactory Razer Phone 2 has a 50% increase in screen brightness compared to the previous generation The constant is 1440p, and the silky smooth 120hz refresh rate It’s difficult to show you this in my video because it was shot with 24 frames The 120Hz screen looks incredibly smooth Coupled with the greatly improved brightness this year This is one of the best look and feel experience you can get on your phone Some other obvious changes are This year uses a glass back panel, so it supports wireless charging The camera system is also updated The same dual lens, but improved optical system and software optimization The logo on the back also supports Razer Chroma If you are not familiar with it Can be understood as Razer RGB light effect management system You can use it as a message reminder Or just show a specific light effect The point is that you have 16.8 million colors RGB to choose from From then on you can live RGB life This year it also supports IP67 waterproof This is something that Razer phones didn’t have last year The speakers have also been upgraded Last year’s Razer phone had the best speakers on the market This year's Razer Phone 2 is even better It’s louder and clearer than the previous generation Obviously, Razer Phone 2 will once again win this year's best speaker award Razer Phone 2 upgraded to Snapdragon 845 processor And a vacuum chamber soaking plate is used to control the temperature during the game Same as last year, 8Gb RAM, 4000 mAh battery But obviously the Razer phone 2 with the new Soc will be better optimized So the battery life will be slightly better than the previous generation Especially with the 120Hz high refresh rate screen, it can still achieve 10 hours of battery life.

It's time to say the price Last year's Razer phone 700 dollars This year, 800! Up $100 I don’t think the Razer phone was cheap last year But i think it's a good price But this year it broke through the price range of top mobile phones Because you have to know that in 2018, a phone with an asking price of $800 will never be cheap Several notebooks were also released in this conference I am most interested in it is this This is a limited mercury version of the Razer Blade I think this is one of the best looking notebooks on the market Unlike the title, this is not a pure white notebook The keyboard is white and also supports Razer Chroma backlight I think the white one looks better than the black keyboard The metal body is not painted, it is just the bright silver of the metal But this is almost crazy craftsmanship The texture on this makes it look great It just reflects light in a specific direction It's the same on the A side, but it lacks the green logo that we often see in the black version.

This looks more low-key, just a polished silver logo The interface has also changed from the original green to black The whole notebook looks very nice in my eyes I have seen too many black notebooks But I prefer white products I like white notebooks, this is one of the best looking white notebooks I have ever seen Razer did not deal with it cheaply They can also color it, or use other cheap processing methods to make it look white or silver But Razer doesn't They use classic craftsmanship to make it look amazing Personally, this looks more like a classic macbook pro with silver polish in the 90s, I like it My only concern is durability If I buy this mercury version of the spirit blade, I will probably put dbrand marble or white stickers on it Razer also released a new low-end spirit blade Has a lower price and the configuration is not bad Now you can buy a Thunder Snake Spirit Blade for only $1,600 The third thing they released Maybe I care more than most people Recently I made a video about Razer’s after-sales service I find that their warranty period is shorter than other major manufacturers Like Corsair or Logitech, most products have a two-year warranty But Razer’s gaming products only have a one-year warranty But Razer has now announced that they will provide a two-year warranty for all its products including headphones, keyboards and mice.

This little improvement will make your customers welcome you more I really appreciate Razer's decision This is a wise choice Well, this is their new product and new warranty policy That's basically it I hope you like this video, like to like and follow, see you next time.

As found on YouTube

The Best Gaming Phone Is…

– Hey, guys, this is Austin. Between the ROG Phone
and the Razer Phone 2, 2018 is shaping up to be an awesome year for gaming smartphones. So with both of them on
the desk at the same time, why, I think a good old-fashioned
comparison is in order. First up we have the Razer Phone 2. Now, a couple weeks ago, we were able to get our hands on this, but it was a very brief hands-on, whereas this, this is going to be a little bit more of an in-depth feature comparison
review gaming benchmark. Are there other words
I can put in the title? Do you see how shiny this glass is? It'll never be this shiny again the second I put my
dirty fingerprints on it. Not only do we have a fast
charger included in the box, something that a certain
fruit-themed company might want to take note on, but we also have a series
of cables and dongles. But what's actually kind of interesting about the Razer Phone is that we have a USB-C headphone adapter. Now this might not sound impressive. In fact, it's included on most phones that don't have a headphone jack, which is basically
everything at this point.

But this actually does
support full hi-fi audio and supposedly has a
pretty good DAC inside. Next up we have the ROG Phone, and I actually don't
know to open this box. (Velcro crackling) Oh, wow, okay, that's,
all right, that's a box. All right. (chuckling) First up, we have the phone itself. So the ROG Phone's kind of unique in that not only does it have a USB-C and a headphone jack on the bottom, but it has two more USB-Cs on the side which are meant for accessories. So the last time I tried the ROG Phone, it was still a fairly early prototype, and I've gotta say, immediately,
this feels really nice.

We do have that, actually, is that aluminum? That's gotta be aluminum. It's incredibly heavy, though, wow. It really feels nice, and it's got such a heft in the hand, and unlike the Razer Phone, which is basically a
giant squared-off brick, this is much more rounded and a little bit more of
a hand-friendly shape. Something unique about the ROG Phone is that unlike basically every
other gaming phone out there, there's a wide range of accessories that are either included in
the box such as this fan, or other things that'll
be available for purchase.

You know what I feel like right now? I feel like ROG is trying to make the ultimate ROG Phone, right? Like, when we do Building the Ultimate, we try to find the ridiculous
and crazy accessories, but they're just selling
all of the accessories. You could literally
get everything you need to build the ultimate ROG
Phone straight from the store. Not only does it have the RGB, but it also has a fan,
USB-C, headphone jack, all that stuff, which is
rearranged to the bottom. This is cool. I really appreciate that
they put this in the box. I don't want to get too
into the dock right now, but the idea is that when
you're using the phone in landscape mode, your hand
is naturally covering up not only the headphone
jack but also the USB-C, so in addition to be able to
get a little bit of cooling, you also have those ports
on the bottom of the phone so you can easily plug it
in, plug your headphones in, and you won't get in
the way of your hands. (box thumping) Wait, what'd you, what are you doing? A Black Shark? Wait, are you trying to add another phone to the comparison in
the middle of the video? "You're Gamer, Let's Shark!" Oh boy, this looks exciting.

What's the deal with this? Oh. Oh, this is not the
original Black Shark at all. Okay, this is an unprecedented move in that there's a brand-new
unreleased smartphone on my desk and I literally
don't know anything about it, except that it looks kind of cool! That's something to know about it, right? So it's got a kind of combination
of aluminum on the sides but it still does have
that glass back panel, and I'm assuming that looks
kind of like an RGB logo? Oh, wow, that's quite the gamer skin, and, oh yeah, we do have
a RGB logo on the back. I like how we have this great comparison: look, it's the ROG Phone
versus the Razer Phone. It all makes sense. And now, I'm like, wait a minute, there's this totally new phone
that I have no idea about. I have to figure it out on the fly.

This is cool, though. I guess they've definitely
upped the RGB game. I mean, that's a look right there. So it looks like you
can individually change not only the logo color, but also the little Shark
Mode thing on the side. "By pressing the Shark button, "your phone will become a game console." What, a game console? In a smartphone? That's crazy! So after spending some
time with the Black Shark, a few things come to mind. First of all and probably the
most important for the video is that this is not a final phone and it's certainly not final software. There's definitely some tweaks that are going to need to go
on before this is released. And also, a lot of the
benchmarks and stuff don't even work yet, so
we're gonna take some of this with a grain of salt. There's also the controller, which actually doesn't
attach to the phone.

It attaches to the case
that comes with the phone, so it's maybe not the most
elegant way of doing it, but it's sort of like you
would expect with a Joy-Con. The only problem is that the controller only works wirelessly, so even though you can slide
it on, something like this, it actually doesn't attach with any kind of wires or whatever, so you still need to separately charge not only the controller
but the phone itself. The big problem is that this
is a Chinese market phone, which means that here
in the United States, well, it doesn't have
the Google Play store, or any kind of Google apps at all. Now there will be a global
version of this phone, and hopefully that will include, you know, the fundamental apps that you
would expect like YouTube, but for now, it's kind of
hard to get apps on this, unless of course you wanna play a little bit of Fortnite by chance.

All three phones have the very familiar Snapdragon 845 inside. So the ROG is slightly clocked higher, but the main difference between the three is that the Black Shark has an optional 10 gigabyte of RAM option, whereas the others only top out at a measly eight gigs of memory. Coincidentally, they all
have the exact same size 4,000-milliamp hour battery, which is a good thing for gaming, but from here, the
differences start to stand out just a little bit more. The first big difference is with displays. The Black Shark has a
perfectly respectable six-inch 2160x1080p panel. It's good but nothing spectacular, especially when you compare it to both the ROG Phone as
well as the Razer Phone. Move over to the ROG Phone, and while it does have that same size as well as resolution of the Black Shark, it is an OLED panel
running at a full 90 Hertz.

Now as far as I know,
this is the first time that any phone has hit 90
Hertz with an OLED panel. The Razer Phone has a slightly
smaller 5.7-inch display, but it is a much higher
resolution at 2560×1440, and importantly, it runs at a whopping 120 hurt refresh rate. Hertz, not hurt. It doesn't hurt to refresh,
it Hertz to refresh.

The only real downside is that
this is a very wide phone, specifically when you put it side by side with the Black Shark and the ROG. It's just not quite as
comfortable to hold, but that screen is really
well-optimized for video. Let's talk about these
screens for a second. The ROG Phone has a very
accurate OLED panel, and even though it's not the most well-calibrated thing in the world, it looks nice to the eye. The Razer Phone thankfully
is much, much brighter than the original version
of the Razer Phone. Again, it's not quite 100% there, but it is a lot better than
the previous generation.

And the Black Shark looks nice, but again, it's not quite final, so it's hard to run
any kind of real tests. It looks goods, but I really
feel like the winner here is the ROG just purely based on the looks. Where these phones really shine is with the higher refresh rate, so it's really hard to show on video, but even the 90 Hertz of the ROG Phone really does make a big
difference in small things like scrolling through a
webpage or moving between menus.

It really does seem a lot more fluid, and that definitely does
apply to the Razer Phone. Now, to my eye, I
actually can't really see a major difference between
90 Hertz and 120 Hertz. Theoretically, this is
a little bit smoother, and I will say it looks
maybe a little bit sharper when you're moving between things, but realistically, both these phones are a big step up over the Black Shark, or, well, every other 60
Hertz phone out there, which is basically all of them.

All three have dual front-firing speakers, but there's a clear winner as
far as which one sounds best. – 780-998-9551 Hey, guys, this is Austin. The Microsoft Surface line
has been growing a lot lately, with everything from a desktop all-in-one with the Surface Studio all the way down to the
cheap and tiny Surface Go, there's a lot to like. – I guess the ROG Phone
wins by default here. That's not what I was expecting. So the problem with the Razer Phone is at least with my specific unit, even though it is very
loud and very clear, there's definitely a
little bit of distortion on the very high volume. Something the ROG Phone
definitely does right are the extra features and accessories that come along with it. One of the main ones
is the squeeze feature. This is somewhat to what
you'll find on the Pixel where if I squeeze it, what
happens is it turns into ROG Gaming X Mode. The thing with X Mode is you
actually can customize it to do whatever you want, but I just like going X Mode, not X Mode.

X Mode! It's just kind of fun to do. But it's not only just for show, so if you flip the ROG Phone over, on the top are the AirTriggers. This essentially adds physical controls to the top of the phone, giving it a little bit more
of a controller kind of feel. The way it works is that each of them can be mapped to a specific
button on the screen. The way it works is that
inside the X Mode software, you can adjust the actual
touchpoint of where you want it, so for example, my right trigger is the actual trigger in the game, and my left is to go on to the sights.

You can do it however you
want, but the thing is, this is a really, really nice addition to give you a little bit
more of a physical control on a phone without having to carry around, like, you know, a
controller, or accessories. One downside to the ROG Phone is that this is one of the hottest devices that I've ever tested. Now it doesn't get uncomfortably warm, but after a few minutes of gaming, it does get a little bit toasty, which is where the included fan comes in. So what you do is snap
this on to the USB-C ports on the bottom of the phone. As soon as you clamp it on, not only will the RGB logo light up, but it will start a pretty easy little fan which will cool the back of the phone. Now in testing this doesn't make a massive difference to performance. What it does do is cool
off the back of the phone to make it a lot nicer
for when you're, you know, doing extended Fortnite gaming sessions and not sweating your fingers up.

Can you sweat your fingers up? Is that, I can't say
that, can I, that's weird. So what's the best gaming phone of 2018? Well, I really like a lot
of what Razer has done with the Razer Phone 2. I gotta give it to the ROG Phone. Not only does it have great
performance, it looks nice. It's got a lot of really cool features, but really, what kind of sells this to me over everything else is this
is the first gaming phone that's not only good at gaming, but it's also good at being a phone, and that, that kind of means a lot.

(electronic static) (screen humming) (deep breath) Hey, guys, this is– (electronic music).

As found on YouTube

Light Phone 2 Review | Can This Phone Cure Your Social Media Addiction?

– [Eric] Do you think you have a social media phone problem? – For sure! For sure I am addicted in some
way or another to my phone. (ethereal music) – [Eric] I'm Eric Limer, Tech Editor at Gear Patrol, and I tested the Light Phone 2. It's a tiny little E-ink smartphone that's designed to try to help you break your worst social media habits by literally not supporting
social media at all, ever. And we took it around to
some folks in the office to get their knee jerk first impressions.

I talked to Gear Patrol
co-founder and fellow geek, Ben Bowers, for his thoughts about it, and then I'll let you
know the kind of deep, dark, existential questions, that using a phone like this makes you stare into the
mirror and ask yourself. (ethereal music) – Okay, very devicey. – It's cool. It's kinda cute. – It says, Go Light. – All right, correct me
if I go off track here. It is a phone for people who
don't wanna use their phone, but do wanna use their phone
enough to get a separate phone that does nearly all of
what their phone does, except for one or two
very specific things? – Stripped down, old school, but new school at the same time. Kinda like it! I'm gonna hit the little button here and I've got phone numbers! – No social, no camera, no anything. Can I send text messages with it? – [Eric] Yes it has texts, calls, maps.

– Okay, that's kinda cool. I remember when the original came out, it was so limited that it was– – [Eric] Just phone. – Yeah, it was so pure that it made so little sense
in terms of actual use. I think they're going
in the right direction. – Nice little qwerty keyboard I could probably pen
something out this way. Quick touch, little feedback. Buzzing which is cool and all right, so I'm lookin' at just phone, texts, right? No camera, no social. – I mean they're going in the direction of becoming an actual phone, like smartphone, iPhone. But it's cool. I can't bash the concept that hard. – It's probably a nice way to unplug, but stay plugged. – In initially trying to use it, I'm going to go ahead and say that I do not understand how to use it. – I would be into something like this. I could, as much as I
love checkin' the socials, and postin' stuff, I could be into this maybe
as a part-time phone.

Maybe it's a weekend device. – I'm gonna guess it
costs somewhere about, (buzzes) let's call it $200.00 bucks? – [Eric] It's $349.00. – $349.00. The price of a fairly recent used iPhone. Maybe it's a good stop-gap thing. Maybe it'll be a fun dry
January-type of phone. But if you stick with this for too long, you are going to be left behind. – Okay, so $349.00 for this guy! Yeah, that's a tough sell unfortunately. As much as I think this is cool, I feel like it would need to be a lot more bulletproof feeling. It's a little plasticky for that amount. But I still think the concept
is cool and very valid. I would just hope that
it could be something… You know I have kids, too. I think this could be an awesome device for a young middle-schooler. But I don't know if $340.00's gonna work when I can get something
basically of full-fledged (chuckles) device for man, $60.00 bucks with a plan.

Tough sell on the price, awesome concept. – Ultimately it's cool. I wish that it made
sense for me to use it. It definitely seems
better than the first one, but instead of buying a separate phone you could just delete some apps. – [Ben] My first gut
is that it feels a lot like the old Nexus 5
with this matte plastic, but I don't know why it
needs to be so tiny! (laughs) – Yeah I know, it is so– – It's a little hard to grip. – It is so ridiculously small. – I actually, I mean I assume the battery
life is pretty good. I don't mind the E-ink at all. I mean overall the matteness
of it is kinda nice in an age where you get the smear-heavy fingerprint stuff.

What can this do besides call and text? – It's got alarms right now. (chuckles) There is (chuckles) ride share and maps are coming in the future, along with some basic music stuff. So rudimentary features rolling out– – It's got a headphone jack. Too bad no one has headphones anymore with a headphone jack. (laughing) That's a loss. So is this still a version
where it has to require another cell phone to get internet, to get cellular service? – [Nick] No.

– [Ben] Or is it still encapsulated? – [Nick] No, it is, so yeah, so the Light Phone 1 was designed to be a second
phone and tether off yours, but this one has a SIM card in it, can text, and call directly, so it's a fully-featured phone. – So essentially the point of this device is to be something where if
you feel like you're addicted to your typical cell phone, you can't stop browsing
Instagram, whatever, you can use this as a
communication device? – Right.

– I think there's some
appeal to that today. I mean Apple, Android, they've both rolled out a
bunch of software updates to show you how you're using your phone. You can even put limits
on how much time you use. I guess if you really lack self-control, you just physically remove
yourself from the phone. I really like the plastic, I just don't– – Yeah, that's a really nice throwback. I don't know why…

I mean I guess just, I don't know why (chuckles) they stopped making Soft
Touch plastic phones. – How does the screen look outdoors? Because that's one
issue with E-ink, right, is can you get enough contrast ratio. – [Nick] Yeah, I mean it's
looked great outdoors to me. I mean it's arguably better than the… My smartphone has a glare on it, but with the matte screen
it looks pretty good. – [Ben] I think the idea of this phone is really interesting because
we love these things so much and now everyone pretty much agrees that we love 'em a little too much. But personally, I don't know
if I could live with this. But I do think we're
seeing a social movement, I mean Apple has admitted it, Google has admitted it with
these screen time apps, that think society is
waking up to the fact that we're getting more
addicted to these devices and so there is a
movement to try to retain what got us hooked on these
things in the first place, which was communication at all times without all of the junk.

I just don't know if that
movement is too early for something like this to succeed. (ethereal music) – [Nick] One of the most
immediately striking things about the Light Phone 2
is obviously the design. It's really nice and
minimalist and cohesive. The black and white of the E-ink really meshes nice with
this whole grey look. It's got this great Soft
Touch plastic on the back which is something that you don't find in a lot of phones anymore. The weight and heft of it is really nice; it feels like a device that
was really well considered. And it works, which is always good in a phone. You can use it to send
messages and make phone calls. The texts go through, the call quality is pretty good and it works on the major carriers. While the Light Phone 2 is
definitely super appealing both in an abstract sense and when you have it in your hands, there are a lot of gripes
I have about using it which is a weird thing to get into because those are also
sort of the point, right.

For instance, the user interface is… The Light Phone doesn't do a lot, so it's user interface
can be pretty simple, but it's also pretty abstract
to find your way around. When you actually go to type
text messages for example, the keyboard, which
always comes up landscape, so you have to twist
the phone to the side, is extremely small, (chuckles) it's a small phone, which makes typing on it difficult, which is then again compounded by the fact that since it's an E-ink screen when you make typos, and you will, and then you erase them, there's some strange artifacting. It's not as seamless as when you're typing on any smartphone from
the past five years. But you can't quite hold that against it, because that's also the point. There's this little bit
of a weird situation here where every time that I want to knock the Light Phone 2 for introducing more friction
to the use experience, it's like that's also the point, so it's a little bit weird to engage with.

The other main thing we have to talk about when we talk about the Light Phone 2 is what it doesn't do. Not what it doesn't do on purpose, but what it is suppose
to do but doesn't do yet. While for now the Light Phone 2 only supports calling and text messaging as its means of communication, there's a lot of stuff
built in here for more: You'll notice the Light
Phone 2 has a headphone jack. Eventually there's supposed
to be music playback features with a interesting little
bit of a dividing line of, it will allow you to play
music that you already have, but the creators have said they're not gonna include
music discovering stuff. The Light Phone 2 also has
Bluetooth and WiFi built-in, which again it doesn't really use for any of its current slate of features, but that lays the groundwork
for a future feature where this phone could act
as a WiFi hotspot, right.

So instead of trying to
do things directly on it, you could use it to connect
another device to the internet. I think it says a lot
about the state of phones, the state of technology, the state of internet in
general that this exists, and it's a good thing! There's nothing I would like more then to have devices that
have a built-in interest in keeping me from using
them literally all the time. But when we're looking at this, the Light Phone 2, as it exists right now, you do have to ask yourself, could I use it for me? No. And I hope that some point in the future there will be a device like this, but Light Phone something else, that either shares the
same priorities that I do, or has enough options for personalization that I think I can.

I do think that the Light
Phone could be a good fit for a lot of people, but those people are going to have to be an extremely good fit for the Light Phone. This is a device that is
appealing to a very big need, but it is serving a very
small target market right now. And if you're in that, that's terrific, if you're not, I would caution you against trying to squeeze
yourself into it too hard because you might regret it..

As found on YouTube

The Worlds Most ‘Professional’ Phone? – Durability Test!

the phone in front of us today costs a whopping 2 500 the sony xperia pro no extra numbers no really long name just a really long price tag this might very well be the only real professional phone in existence and for that price it better be inside the box we get a usbc cable 18 watt charging brick and some corded headphones that have a headphone jack that right there might be worth two thousand dollars to some people it's always a little annoying when the charging cable that's included with the box is the short and stubby little guy that can barely reach anything personally for the last three years i've been using one of these super long six foot usbc cables next to my bed from my channel sponsor anchor and it's pretty amazing right now you can get two of these super long six foot usb-c cables with a lifetime warranty for just 15 bucks at the link in the description i'm not sure if that price is a typo or not but you might want to jump on it before anchor notices what they've done at twenty five hundred dollars this is one of the most expensive phones we've ever tested here on jerry rig everything it's definitely a professional price tag and while i am indeed a professional i don't think i'm quite the type of professional this phone was built for let's get started [Music] [Applause] [Music] right off the bat the first thing i notice about this phone is that it feels and looks like it's sitting inside of a built-in protective case it's got a lightweight textured plastic exterior the second thing i notice is the screen this is one of the only phones in existence with a 4k resolution display which is pretty awesome i'm able to see these tiny footprints in the snow or the detail on the trees without the pixels getting in the way that's pretty incredible the xperia pro display is forty percent more detailed than an iphone 12 pro screen with a screen that's nice it would be a real shame if someone scratched it but i'll take one for the team if you listen really closely you can also hear that there's no camera bump on the back the xperia pro is primarily designed to be a second monitor for the sony dslr camera while at the same time using its 5g internal antennas to live stream or upload the high quality imagery to the internets which is a unique combination of characteristics we'll talk about that more in a second but the important thing is is that the gorilla glass 6 scratches at a level six with deeper grooves at a level seven the display is also super long with its 21×9 aspect ratio and up here at the very top it has an 8 megapixel selfie camera tucked into the bezel right there next to the earpiece slit the earpiece doesn't have any exterior grilles the sides of the phone are more rugged than usual and are made out of a hard rough textured plastic you might have noticed that there's also a plethora of buttons along the side the bottom button is a textured camera button that can activate the camera to take pictures just like a shutter button right above that we have a programmable button that can activate any app or start up its external monitor features both of which are made from metal above that we have the recessed power button which also doubles as a fingerprint scanner we'll get back to that then up top we have the volume rocker which is also made from metal the xperia logo is just overlaid and painted onto the plastic and will probably eventually rub off in your pocket the pro part of that logo is inlaid three dimensionally and is the only part of the branding that won't rub off on its own up at the top of the phone we do have that headphone jack it's kind of strange that in order to get a headphone jack on your phone these days you either gotta spend two thousand dollars or two hundred the right side of the phone has no buttons just more textured plastic it does have a sim and sd card tray that does not need a removal tool it can pull out with just your fingers it makes it much easier to swap memory cards which is a pretty professional feature you might also have noticed that this phone has an ip rating of ip65 ip68 kind of strange and that's because down here at the bottom things start getting weird alongside the normal usbc port there is a full on micro hdmi port this is how the xperia pro gets its high quality 4k 60fps footage imported from the full frame dslr for streaming over 5g if you understood all that congrats on being hip lit with your gucci on fleek and if you're a little lost well there's always bingo knight long story short this phone is ip68 when the flap is closed and when it's open it's only ip65 so be careful on the back of the xperia pro it does have some cameras of its own a 12 megapixel telephoto lens a 12 megapixel wide angle lens a 3d time-of-flight depth camera and then down at the bottom we have the 12 megapixel main camera nothing super crazy special or out of the ordinary but sony is really good at making cameras it's kind of their thing the nfc pad is located in the center of the back panel right underneath this symbol here there is no wireless charging now sony has been around for a really long time they are one of the largest companies in the world they've got their logo subtly recessed into the back of the phone one of sony's very first products they ever made was a transistor radio back in 1955 then in 1957 they made the world's smallest portable radio that really took off putting sony on the map the name sony is derived from the latin word for sound which makes sense since they were you know making radios before all that though one of their very first products ever [Music] was a rice cooker which is what you see here bet you didn't see that one coming personally i for one am glad sony branched out and explored new markets the back panel of the xperia pro does look to be glued down and is water resistant sony phones are normally notoriously difficult and complicated to take apart but maybe this time will be different make sure you're subscribed so you don't miss the teardown the screen is still my favorite part of the phone with 10 bits of color and 4k resolution it all sounds super impressive until you remember that last year's xperia 1 mark ii also had a 10 bit 4k display and it only cost a thousand dollars this might hurt sony's feelings but i think that if you don't need the very very specific ability to live stream bingo knight in full-frame 4k 60 fps then last year's mark ii is definitely the better choice of cell phone the oled does last 25 seconds under the heat from my lighter though finally the xperia pro does have a side mounted capacitive fingerprint reader i've already scratched it once and for the most part it still works to read my finger if i add a few more scratches after the fingerprint is set it still manages to function most of the time just not all the time finally the bin test i'm a big fan of the rugged design on this xperia pro the recessed camera lens and textured plastic back make for a much more durable phone design with less exposed glass parts to break structurally when bent from the back there is a slight curve to the phone which since it's so long it's kind of expected but it does lock out and doesn't break when bent from the front we get the same thing a slight bend but the 2 500 smartphone holds strong and stays in one piece not too shabby interesting how the most rugged looking phone that we've tested in quite a while is also the most expensive by far it's like a sleeper phone moral of the story though if you really need a 4k display just grab last year's xperia mark ii the rest of us will be just fine with all the other phones that have professional in the name but are actually just pretending the people this phone was really built for are probably all still out there working right now while you're watching this video they're out there being all professional and stuff with no time for the internet or a computer you know workaholics let me know what you think would you ever use a phone like this come hang out with me on instagram and twitter and hit that subscribe button if you haven't already thanks done for watching i'll see you around

As found on YouTube

Vivo Nex Dual Screen – Triple Camera – Durability Test!

Remember that phone from last year with the
motorized pop-up camera – the Vivo Nex S? Well Vivo is back at it again with another
super innovative design, with both a screen on the front and back of their latest flagship. In the box comes with headphones, charger,
and a thick bumper case to protect the phone from drops. It's time to see how much thought Vivo put
into durability. Let's get started. [Intro] This is the second dual screen phone we've
seen. With the Nubia X, switching screens was a
carefully calculated, simultaneous double button press. But with this Vivo phone, pressing one power
button on the right side of the phone will activate whatever side is facing you much
easier. It also has a 3 finger side swipe to switch
between the screens on the go, which is as equally easy. So the whole point of a dual screen phone
is to one, look cool, but also to get rid of an notches or hole punches in the larger
front display. With an additional screen on the back, all
selfies can be done with the higher quality rear main cameras, instead of having lower
quality front cameras taking up space inside of a notch.

The main camera on this phone has 3 LED lights
for better lit pictures. Two of which can activate a circular lunar
ring for more even light during pictures or videos. You know, the same circular lights that YouTubers
might use during makeup tutorials. I'm going to leave the makeup tutorials to
the experts, but a ring light is definitely a cool addition to a cell phone camera. The included case has a solid fit. I always have a case on my personal device,
so I'm glad Vivo added some extra protection in the box. Speaking of protection, there is also an included
plastic screen protector on the front surface. The guys over at Vivo are getting all the
bonus points today. As you know, with my systematic durability
test, we check the scratch resistance of the screen with Mohs scale of hardness.

It's a pretty safe bet that if a company isn't
advertising sapphire, it's probably going to be tempered glass, which is where we start
seeing faint scratches at a level 6, with deeper grooves at a level 7. Vivo was the first manufacturer to come out
with an under display fingerprint scanner, and the same technology is here in this phone
as well. Underneath the front screen, protected by
the front glass, the display shines up onto your fingerprint. And the little sensor underneath the display
can tell if it's your finger or not so you can unlock the phone securely.

With two screens, we need double the testing
since there's twice as much real estate to cover. Let's scratch test the back. Dbrand should start making clear skins for
these dual screen phones. This side as well is covered by a screen protector,
which makes sense. Screen protectors not only stop scratches,
but also add a cushion layer of impact protection so brittle glass doesn't shatter right away
during a drop. This time after testing all the different
levels, we still find tempered glass covering the back panel, resulting in scratches at
6, with deeper grooves at a level 7.

The rear design of the Vivo dual screen phone
is unique. Instead of a metal lip around the camera lens,
the whole circular unit is glass and protrudes just slightly over the top of the rear glass
panel. With it's own little screen protector, the
circular camera lens is very solidly adhered to the rear panel. Even with some prying from my razor blade,
it doesn't want to come off. The back panel, surprisingly, does have it's
own earpiece, a bi-directional earpiece speaker shooting out both the front and the back. This will be fun to see from the inside. It's a thin little sliver, especially here
on the front side, to minimize the bezels. But the grille can come off on it's own. There isn't much adhesive holding it in place.

It's definitely interesting to see speaker
grilles on both sides of the phone. Speaking of sides, the material inside of
this dual screen sandwich is metal, the long volume button, and power buttons are both
made from metal. The bottom of the phone has a loud speaker
and USB-C charging port, along with a dual SIM card tray, with a protective rubber ring
around the opening to help keep water out. The Vivo Nex Dual Display doesn't have an
official IP rating, but it's good to see some steps were taken. This hole is protected and I'll have to check
the other holes from the inside during the teardown.

The far side of the phone is also made from
metal, along with the second tower button with Vivo printed on the surface. And what's this? Dost mine eyes deceive me? A headphone jack. You gotta love a phone with all the features. Another interesting design choice is at the
edge of the screen on both the front and the back are surrounded by a layer of plastic. Plastic as we know is much softer than metal
or glass, so it does provide a nice cushion layer between the hard metal sides and the
clear brittle glass. So if it does happen to get dropped, it might
not break as easy.

It's a good thing, and not something you would
notice at first glance. With the previous dual screen phone I tested,
the Nubia X, it had an LCD front panel, while the smaller rear panel was AMOLED. This phone, the Vivo Nex Dual Display, has
a larger rear screen than the Nubia at 5.5 inches and it's still a 1080p AMOLED. It's kind of sad when you think that the backup
screen on this phone is still higher resolution than Apple's iPhone XR. No permanent marks were left on the display,
even after my lighter was in place for 45 seconds. It might be the dual thickness of the clear
camera lens glass. But even with all that heat, there is no separation
of the rather unique circular lens. There's a 12 megapixel main camera, a 2 megapixel
depth sensor, and another 3D camera called TOF for Time of Flight for facial recognition
are all back here.

The TOF camera has some pretty cool 3D scanning
capabilities. I jumped into the camera app to check it out. It has the standard measure of banana features
that a lot of phones have. But it also has this pretty in depth 3D face
scanning unlocking thing that Vivo claims is better than Apple's. But I think we can all agree that this is
either super creepy or super awesome. Isn't that right, Digital Jerry? [Jerry nods] The front screen is a massive 6.4 inch, no
notch, 1080p AMOLED display. This time with different placement of my lighter,
and without the dual layers of glass, a white burn mark appeared at about 27 seconds and
never did quite recover. And now for the bend test. This phone has no moving parts, just one solid
hunk of glass, metal and plastic. And the whole contraption seems very heavy
and very solid, with only a slight bend during the flex, but with no creaks, snaps, kinks,
or cracks anywhere in the body, even when bent from both directions. I like where things are headed. This whole flagship phone with dual screens,
3D camera, headphone jack, and in-screen fingerprint scanner is still cheaper than Apple's budget
iPhone, the XR.

And Vivo's phone comes with double the internal
memory. Vivo's got my attention. I'm impressed and I'm excited to see what
they come out with next. Hit that subscribe button if you haven't already
so we can find out together. And come hang out with me over on Twitter. Thanks a ton for watching. I'll see you around..

As found on YouTube

A Rugged SAPPHIRE Covered Smartphone? – Durability Test!

Kyocera, a name I haven't heard of in a while,
has released a new phone. An extremely rugged smartphone called the
Dura Force Pro 2. Kyocera claims this phone has a full sapphire
display, but there's only one way to find out for sure. At only $450, this should be interesting. On the back of the phone it says 'Class 1
Division 2' which means this phone can be used in hazardous locations without causing
explosions. Gotta love that. Let's get started. [Intro] Right out of the box the phone feels smooth,
plastic, almost fluffy compared to the dense glass and metal phones we're used to seeing. It definitely still has that rugged, durable
look to it. Let's get started with the scratch test. A phone with real sapphire on the display
doesn't come around very often. As we know, these Mohs hardness picks tell
the difference between different materials.

Plastic would leave marks at a level 3. Normal glass would scratch at a 6. And sapphire should only start to scratch
at level 8. Sapphire has a totally different composition
than glass. It's a crystal structure that's actually grown
in a lab, and it's hardness level is up there with precious gems and diamonds. An incredibly impressive, expensive and premium
material. Taking a look at the level 6 and 7 pick locations
where glass normally starts to scratch, we see no marks. The screen of this Dura Force Pro 2 is still
flawless. Let's take it up to a level 8. Finally, at a level 8 we start to see some
damage. This is exactly where we would expect sapphire
to be. It's what we saw on the HTC U Ultra Sapphire
edition, as well as the sapphire covered Tissot watches that I've used to explain sapphire
in the past.

Kyocera says the camera lens on the back of
the phone is sapphire as well. We'll be verifying that in just a second. A level 9 pick, of course, also leaves marks
on the crystal, as would diamonds at a level 10, but I'm kind of fresh out of those at
the moment. The earpiece up at the top is covered in plastic
and can be scratched. The whole phone is designed to handle abuse
though and keep working. So superficial damage is kind of irrelevant. There is a 5 megapixel selfie camera under
that same sapphire display, so it's definitely protected from scratches.

The thick knobby corners of this phone are
made from a softer, slightly grippy plastic. Under the large flap on the side we have our
SIM and SD expandable memory slot, and a dedicated camera button below that. This can be programmed to be a Google assistant
or another app instead. It's super nice of Kyocera to let us choose
how to use our own buttons. Phenomenal idea. I hope Samsung is watching. The bottom of the phone has a huge, watertight
ip68 plastic flap covering the USB-C charging port. We have even more plastic along the sides,
with another large programmable button on the left side. This button is supposed to be 'push-to-talk',
a radio style button, but can also be remapped to literally anything else. I'm a fan. The volume rocker is also made from plastic. And look what we have up here. A headphone jack – instant thumbs up. It's protected with the same watertight flaps
that cover the SD card and charging port. This durable smartphone's turning out to be
a winner. The power button doubles as a fingerprint
scanner. I'll scratch that up to simulate a guy on
YouTube who scratches stuff.

But while adding my fingerprint I would get
constant 'fingerprint is dirty' messages. Even when it finally did accept my fingerprint,
the dirty little fingerprint scanner was not efficient at recognizing my finger, nor would
it unlock the screen every time. There are always other ways to unlock your
phone of course, but the weaker fingerprint scanner is just something to keep in mind. The back of the Kyocera Dura Force Pro 2 has
4 smooth hard rubber pads on each of the corners. Definitely an added perk for drop protection. Now back to the sapphire. It's a pretty incredible substance. The optically clear stuff used in technology
and like on phone screens and camera lenses is lab grown, fabricated in a lab over weeks
into a large clear cylinder called a boule.

This massive chunk of sapphire is then bored
out and cut up to make watch faces, or smaller bores to make camera lenses. Or sawed into rectangular chunks and polished
to make smartphone displays like the one here on the Kyocera. It's a fascinating process that I'd love to
show off in real life if anyone over there at Kyocera is watching. The back panel covering the wireless charging
pad is plastic. Not all sapphire is created equal. One company, who shall remain nameless, uses
an impure version of sapphire…Just kidding, it's Apple.

Apple is using junk sapphire on their camera
lenses. You can see here with the piece of sapphire
that's covering the normal 13 megapixel camera, and the 8 megapixel wide angle lens (great
combo by the way), it does not scratch with a level 6 or 7 Mohs pick. It's only when we reach levels 8 and 9 that
the surface of the lens starts to get damaged. This is the good quality sapphire. Apple, on the other hand, has sub-par sapphire
lenses on every single one of their iPhones. Those get scratched starting at levels 6 and
7, just like glass would. There's a definite difference in quality. I'm impressed with Kyocera. Their product is behaving as advertised. Imagine that. Like any rugged smartphone, this guy is supposed
to work in extreme heat, which might just give us another reason for this burn test. I've been struggling for years trying to justify
this one…I mostly just like fire. The 1080p IPS LCD underneath the 5 inch slab
of sapphire on the Kyocera Dura Force Pro 2 lasted 30 seconds under the heat from my
direct flame. Watch how fast I recovers though.

It's ready for round 2 with zero damage done
to the display underneath. Impressive. Now for the bend test. A rugged smartphone with no structure would
be rather dumb. Independent third party testing though is
really the only way to tell. This rock solid Dura Force Pro 2 has zero
flex and passes my durability test. Kyocera has managed to make a durable, rugged
phone out of premium materials, and I'm very impressed. It might even very well be the most durable
phone of this year. Apple should be reaching out to Kyocera to
find a quality sapphire supplier. Should we be putting sapphire on all cell
phone screens? If you enjoyed this video and want to see
other phones tested in the future, hit that subscribe button.

And come hang out with me over on Twitter
and Instagram. Thanks a ton for watching. I'll see you around..

As found on YouTube