Unfolding the first trifold phone

(instrumental music) – Folding phones are boring. Look we've had the first
wave of foldable devices and they're neat, but you've
seen all that already. This is about what comes next after the current generation of foldables. Sling like the tri-fold from TCL, a wild new concept, folding
tablet, phone thing. (techno-music) Unlike most foldables the
tri-fold has two hinges, which lets it fold up into thirds . You can use it as a phone, you can unfold it once
to use as a bigger screen or fold the unfolded
into a full size tablet. It's not a half way compromise
like some of the other foldables that we've seen which basically turn into just slightly
wider phone displays.

This is a full blown tablet. It's nearly as big as an iPad, but you can still fit it in your pocket. The screen folds from a 10 inch tablet down to 6.65 inch phone. You could also open it two-thirds the way and ya know prop that up it'll auto rotate so you can use in whatever
orientation you want. There's a lot of weird use cases that you could probably use this for. The screen on this one is a 3k panel, but again that's just this prototype.

We have no idea if the finished
version will have that, but the tri-fold shows just
how hard it's gonna be to turn these ideas into reality. I've gotten to play around
with the prototype for a bit and it's really rough to use right now. It is incredibly heavy for a phone. It's got those big metal hinges
and there are three separate batteries to power all those displays, it's basically three phones.

And even though it's really
thin as a tablet the phone mode is super thick and that's
before your worrying about things like the software, which is basically non-existent. Durability which is a huge question or price which who even knows. (techno music) But looking even further into the future. TCL also had a very early
mock up of a rollable phone. This is really cool idea
that's a phone that has a fully flexible display that
slides around the side and behind the phone. And it could roll back out
and become a larger display when you need more space. The way it will, in theory, work is that there's gonna be motors
on the inside of the phone and you'll press a button
and it'll expand out from a 6.75 inch display
to a 7.8 inch screen.

Now that doesn't sound like a
lot, but your actually getting almost double the screen space
it's almost twice as wide. The whole system is actually
pretty similar to the rollable Oled TV that LG's been
showing off for years. Now again this is a really early concept, it's not even a functional
device, just plastic and a screen that's literally
just a sheet of paper.

Is this a good idea? Who knows. It does avoid some of the
issues of current foldables, like those easily breakable hinges and the creased display which is cool. But it's almost guaranteed
to have issues of its own. Moving parts they're tricky. Now the tri-fold is
just a proof of concept and the plastic sliding one even more so. You won't actually be able to
buy either of these devices and it's not clear if TCL's
actually gonna make products based on these concepts in the future.

So why should you care. Well, first of all, because it's cool. I mean look at this thing
it's a phone that unfolds into a giant full size tablet. And it actually turns on and runs android, it's like a science fiction prop. But it's also important,
because TCL is planning on eventually making
foldable and rollable phones that might actually look like these. Possibly as early as next year. The company says that it's
experimenting with dozens of different form factors right now.

So it's possible that phones like these, could be real one day. Look phones have basically been the same for the last decade. Black boxes with touch screens. Devices like the tri-fold
or that sliding concept, even if they're not here yet, show off what the future phones might one day look like. And that's really exciting idea. Thanks so much for watching. If you want to see more videos
about cool phones check out our Galaxy S20 ultra review. You can actually buy that one.

Check out the review. See if you want to. And like and subscribe for
more great videos like this..

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Vivo Nex S – Hidden Camera Durability Test! – Scratch and Bend

The Vivo Nex S is that sweet looking, bezel-less
Android smartphone with the motorized popup front facing camera, and in-screen fingerprint
scanner. Probably the most futuristic smartphone we've
tested so far this year. Even though it looks epic from the outside,
I'm honestly more excited to take this one apart and review it from the inside. But, like always, we got to test it first
while it's all in one piece. Let's get started. [Intro] Right off the bat this thing looks incredible. Full screen design with no notch just looks
good. The colorful edge to edge display is impressive
all by itself, but we aren't really here to talk about the screen. There is so much other weird tech inside of
this phone to check out, starting with that camera. It just pops out of the top like a daisy in
springtime. It activates by poking out like an accessory
on R2-D2 each time I turn on the front facing camera.

And then it retracts as soon as I switch back
to the rear camera or exit the app. The sound you hear isn't the actual sound
the hardware is making. It's an added affect. There are actually 3 sounds. I'm going to leave mine muted, but if you're
looking to impress your friends or show off the mechanical extremity of your phone, the
extra sound is a nice effect.

The extended camera niblet does feel very
solid. There is no wiggle to the block. And when I press down hard on that camera,
it will dip in for just a second and then come back up, or retract all the way if I
press in too hard. It's still very firm though, and feels like
it can handle it's own. The only way to know for sure will be to see
how solid those tracks are from the inside, and see how the lifting mechanism is made. But for now, it seems like it can handle normal
abuse. Even when I try to hold the camera out while
it's pulling itself inside, the first time the motor is strong enough to yank the camera
from my grip.

But the second time, the gears spin for a
second and then succeed in pulling it back. It's surprisingly strong. Thumbs up for that. We'll come back to the front camera in a second,
but now let's see what else the phone has to offer. It's definitely nice of Vivo to include a
plastic screen protector on both sides of the phone. Any protection is good protection. Now we can start with the scratch test. There is no mention of Gorilla Glass on this
Nex S, but since we've made it past the level 3 pick, we know the screen is not plastic.

We start seeing scratches at a level 6, with
deeper grooves at a level 7, meaning we're looking at tempered glass. Sapphire would be a level 8 unless, of course,
it's Apple's sapphire, that's still a level 6. You might have noticed that there is no earpiece
on this phone. It doesn't pop out with a robotic camera on
top either. The Vivo says it uses vibrations instead of
a speaker. It's definitely a weird thing that takes some
getting used to, but it works. No matter where you put your ear on the frame
of the phone, you can hear sound imminating from the device…kind of like those bone
conduction speakers. For example, this is what a normal earpiece
sounds like. This is coming out of an iPhone 8. It's pretty standard across all smartphones
with a little speaker inside the earpiece. You can't discern one smartphone from the
other just by the earpiece inside of the phone. Unless, of course, there is no earpiece speaker
inside of the phone.

This is what it sounds like from inside the
Vivo S Nex. It's done through vibrations instead of a
speaker, and pretty much sounds the same no matter where you're listening on the phone,
since the vibrations encompass the whole frame. It sounds a lot like a speaker phone, but
contained in a much smaller area. Another successfully hidden component is the
fingerprint scanner hidden underneath the display. I tested this previously with the Vivo X20,
and even with scratches on the glass, the Vivo Nex S still functions. Hiding the scanner under the screen is pretty
impressive – technologically and physically. I made a super in-depth video on what that
particular component looks like with the Vivo X20. It's pretty magical.

With a closeup look at this Nex display, you
can't even see where the scanner is hidden, so they're doing a pretty good job. The sides of the phone are made from metal,
including the volume button and power button. At the top of the phone we have our headphone
jack, which is incredible. Vivo has a bezel-less, notch-less phone and
still includes that headphone jack…while Apple's over there claiming there's no room
and dongles are the way to the future. Last time I checked, Apple's sold 23 different
dongles, so you know what direction Apple's taking their innovation.

Taking a closer look at the front facing 8
megapixel camera. The metal housing is solid with no loose movements
in any direction. The camera lens is made from glass, which
is important because aluminum is lower on the hardness scale than glass is, which means
no matter how many times the lens extrudes out of the phone, it won't ever get scratched
up by the metal right next to it…even if it ends up rubbing a bit. A scratched up camera lens would be annoying. The back of the camera has more metal and
a little auto-lifting logo on the back. I'm still excited to see it from the inside,
but I'll be patient. This phone is not water-resistant by the way. The Vivo Nex has a textured assistant button
on the side. This guy's name is Jovi. I don't know what his competency is compared
to Bixby, Siri, or Google, but he is there permanently.

The bottom of the phone has our standard USB-C
charging port and a dual SIM card tray. Fun fact, if you ever still your little tool
in the wrong hole, like this little microphone hole right here off to the side of the tray,
it probably won't cause any damage since the microphones are placed off at an angle inside
the phone and the tool only goes straight in. The psychedelic back panel is pretty intense. Instead of Vivo just picking one color, we
get all the colors. It is glass, which makes me think that a clear
phone might be a real possibility. I'll have to give that a try. Let me know in the comments if you want to
see that one. One thing I would change is that this camera
setup is doing the whole death sensor blurred background thing.

I still prefer an extra telephoto or wide-angle
camera lens over a blurred background feature. A blurred background can basically be accomplished
with just one lens anyway. The dual color LED flash is also under the
glass on this one. And now for the burn test. This wall to wall, 6.6 inch AMOLED display
lasted quite a while. A burn test is basically a mandatory, yet
semi-pointless stepping stone to get to the next event. Kind of like what algebra is to graduation. The Nex lasted an impressive 16 seconds under
the heat from my lighter, which coincidentally is about how long I lasted in math class. Hit that subscribe button if you haven't yet. The structural bend test is next. We'll see if the motorized rails inside of
the frame compromise the structural integrity of the phone.

There is a little more bend than I'm comfortable
seeing, but still no cracked glass or catastrophic failure no matter what side the pressure is
applied from. So I'm very pleased to report that this technologically
advanced metal and glass sandwich passes my durability test…even the protrudy bits. Phones passing my test is a very good thing. It means that manufacturers are putting thought
into construction and the longevity of our devices, which is good for us as consumers
and our wallets, but also the planet.

Phones are pretty hard to recycle, so the
longer they last, the better. Now we just need Vivo to bring their stuff
here to the United States. Only China, India, Russia, Malaysia, Hong
Kong, and Taiwan get the cool phones at the moment. No US or UK, unfortunately. I'll keep the description updated if that
changes. And come hang out with me on Twitter and Instagram. Thanks a ton for watching, and I'll see you
around..

As found on YouTube

Razer Phone 2 Teardown – The Vapor Chamber is Incredibly Cool

The Razer Phone 2 is one of the coolest phones
I've taken apart in a very long time. Wait till you see this vapor chamber – it's
incredibly impressive. The clear version I made was cosmetically
disappointing, but the guts of this phone more than make up for it. It's time to review the Razer Phone 2 from
the inside. Let's get started. [Intro] One good thing about having the clear version,
is now you can actually watch how deep my knife penetrates every time I remove back
glass covers from phones. All I ever use is the tip. Any deeper, and fragile stuff might get damaged…like
the battery or the power ribbons. The Razer Phone 2 has 10 screws holding the
top plastic plate over the motherboard. The screws are different, so I'm keeping them
organized as I set them off to the side. Then the plastic lifts up just enough for
me to unsnap the back LED panel Lego-style ribbon connector. And the whole thing can be removed from the
phone. The RGB pad is pretty interesting, especially
since it only illuminates specifically around the snake logo when the phone is turned on.

Apple really dropped the ball by not making
their Apple logo glow on the back of the iPhones. I'll pull off the metal bracket over the battery
and charging port plugs and set that off to the side. And then I'll unclip the battery. The bottom half of the phone has another 10
screws, once again, all different sizes. And then amazingly, the whole battery and
wireless charging combo very easily unfolds out of the phone, exposing part of the massive
copper vapor chamber.

And Marquez will be happy to see a larger
and stronger vibrator this year. It's not taptic, but should still get the
job done. The battery is a 4000 milliamp hour monster,
and very much appreciated that it's not strapped in next to the fragile electronics with a
ridiculous amount of adhesive. Now let's finish unburying the ginormous copper
vapor chamber. There are 2 screws holding on the motherboard. I'll unsnap the charging port ribbon with
my plastic pry tool, along with the side button ribbon, like a little Lego. Then I'll unplug the 3 little wire cables
along the right side – there are a lot of those this year. The SIM and expandable memory card tray are
next. I'll pop that out of the phone and get the
little wire cable on the left side unplugged, as well as the front facing camera. Then the motherboard can lift up and out of
the phone body. Still attached is the screen ribbon cable
plugged into the underside of the motherboard. It's got it's own little silver bracket holding
the ribbon in place. I'll set that off to the side. The gob of thermal paste you see is right
over top of the processor on this phone.

The processor is the part that generates the
most heat. The paste helps transfer that heat to the
top left corner of the copper vapor chamber. The rear cameras are also plugged into the
motherboard. We have our normal 12 megapixel lens with
optical image stabilization. And an additional camera with 2x optical zoom
– the perfect combo. I'll let other reviewers handle the comparisons
and see whether the pictures are good or not.

But hardware wise, this is the ideal setup. The front facing camera has quite a lot of
adhesive holding it in place. It's an 8 megapixel little guy. And now for the top stereo speaker. The Razer Phone is known for it's iconically
large speaker grilles, but interestingly enough, the speakers inside aren't that much larger
than normal. Size-wise the speakers are a bit bigger than
the Pixel 3, but not by much. It does have it's own waterproof mesh over
top with a rubber ring to help keep a tight seal against the phone body. But the interesting thing is the tail end
of the speaker. When you mount a large speaker, like a subwoofer,
it's usually placed inside of a box so the speaker has room to move. A lot of cellphones have speakers in such
a tight box that there's no room for movement so they sound terrible. That's not the case with the Razer Phone. The Razer Phone's earpiece has it's own box
with a large air chamber off to the side that allows for speaker movement. It's pretty cool.

I'll just put this back where it came from. The two little square watertight microphone
mesh slots have green rubber on them. It probably wasn't intentional but it still
looks cool. The vapor chamber is still covered up by some
ribbons from down here on the charging port. There are 2 screws holding the board in place. And then an additional 2 screws on the USB-C
port portion. Then the whole thing pulls up and out of the
phone. It's got a little black rubber ring around
the lip of the port, which is good for water resistance, as well as minimizing stress on
the port itself when it gets plugged in.

The bottom speaker, still smaller than you
might think when compared to the outer grille size, also has it's own air compartment right
next to the speaker. And it has it's own water resistant mesh over
top. And finally we're here: the vaper chamber. Basically the whole area inside of the phone. This copper heat sink is pretty awesome. Having a copper plate this large inside of
a phone is already a huge boost to thermal performance over aluminum or steel. But, as I was removing the plate, you can
tell how thick it is.

Basically as the processor heats up the top
left corner of the vapor chamber, the vapor inside also heats up and carries the heat
away to the far side of chamber, where it cools down into liquid and then flows back
to repeat the process. It's kind of like a heat pipe on steroids. Basically a whole radiator for your phone. Pretty fascinating. And you know me, we aren't going to let this
pass by without exploring the inside.

Peeling back the copper, we actually see physical
liquid, not just gas. Little droplets covering the inside of the
copper envelope. I mean, copper along would probably have been
sufficient. But copper combined with liquid and channels
for airflow is seriously some next level stuff. It's like a waterbed inside of your cellphone. Razer is taking smartphone cooling to the
next level. If you like seeing stuff like this, make sure
you're subscribed. You can see that the half currently opened
up is already evaporated.

But this new flap has all the liquid droplets
still inside. Technology is impressive, and Razer definitely
gets a thumbs up for this one. I don't think I'll be able to reuse the chamber
now that it's been opened up. I don't want any sharp metal edges up against
the underside of my battery. The phone will still work without the copper,
it just won't be as efficient under heavy workloads. The chamber is seriously pretty cool. The 120 Hertz screen can be replaced if needed,
but it's glued into the metal body of the phone, so we'll leave it alone for now since
screens don't normally survive the removal process. I'll get the loud speaker tucked back into
place, and the charging port, along with all of it's screws and associated wire cables.

Before I can set the motherboard back down
though, it needs the screen ribbon cable plugged into the underside, screwed in and secured
with it's silver bracket. Then it's ready to be set down into the phone. I haven't turned on this phone in a while. Pretty sure it's dead from the LED flashing
on the back for a few days.

We'll find out in a second. I'll plug in the large charging port ribbon
cable, clips in like a little Lego, as well as the power button ribbon on the left side. Then the whole cool looking battery wireless
charging contraption can slide back onto the phone. Now that I've seen the insides, I'm way more
impressed with the Razer Phone 2. I'll plug in the LED RGBs, add the metal bracket
over the battery connector, and set down the protective plastics over the motherboard. We should be good to go. I'll plug it in while I get the new back glass
into place. Razer has outdone themselves this year with
the cooling system. And there's definitely a new standard in town
for gaming phones. It's a super solid build. Hit that subscribe button if you haven't already. Come hang out with me on Twitter and Instagram,
and let me know if you have any questions down in the comments.

Thanks a ton for watching, and I'll see you
around..

As found on YouTube